Still hope for NIH funding boost?

There still may be hope for a boost to National Institutes of Health funding in 2008. Yesterday the US Senate snuck some $400 million into a bill approved by the House earlier this week for funding the Iraq war. At the end of last year, President Bush linkurl:vetoed a 2008 appropriations bill;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/53858/ that would have raised NIH funding by about $1 billion. In order to get the bill approved, Congress slashed $760 million of proposed NIH funding, resultin

By | May 16, 2008

There still may be hope for a boost to National Institutes of Health funding in 2008. Yesterday the US Senate snuck some $400 million into a bill approved by the House earlier this week for funding the Iraq war. At the end of last year, President Bush linkurl:vetoed a 2008 appropriations bill;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/53858/ that would have raised NIH funding by about $1 billion. In order to get the bill approved, Congress slashed $760 million of proposed NIH funding, resulting in about linkurl:a 1% increase;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/54025/ from last year's support. While the President has vowed to veto the current bill if it contains any non-military budgeting, the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) released a statement thanking Senator Tom Harkin for introducing the bill. For more, check out coverage in linkurl:The Chronicle of Higher Education.;http://chronicle.com/news/article/4498/senate-bill-supports-veterans-benefits-12-billion-for-science

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Avatar of: Joanne Nicholas

Joanne Nicholas

Posts: 2

May 19, 2008

I am a medical researcher with NBC Nightly News. We are looking to interview a young scientist or post doc who did cancer research but is leaving due to the lack of NIH funding; inability to move up to your own lab, etc.\nPlease call my producer, jane Derenowski at 212 664-3251 if you wish to discuss being interviewed.\nThank you.\nJoanne Nicholas 212 664-3801

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