NIH boosts translational funding

The National Institutes of Health linkurl:announced;http://www.nih.gov/news/health/may2008/ncrr-29.htm plans today (May 29) to inject $533 million over the next five years into speeding up the linkurl:bench to bedside;http://www.the-scientist.com/2008/3/1/29/1/ trajectory for new treatments. The funding will go to researchers at 14 academic health centers - including Harvard University, The Scripps Research Institute, Stanford University and others - which will become part of the NIH's Clinical

By | May 29, 2008

The National Institutes of Health linkurl:announced;http://www.nih.gov/news/health/may2008/ncrr-29.htm plans today (May 29) to inject $533 million over the next five years into speeding up the linkurl:bench to bedside;http://www.the-scientist.com/2008/3/1/29/1/ trajectory for new treatments. The funding will go to researchers at 14 academic health centers - including Harvard University, The Scripps Research Institute, Stanford University and others - which will become part of the NIH's Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) consortium. "With more than half of NIH's funding allocated for basic research, the CTSA consortium is perfectly poised to help move discoveries in the laboratory to improved patient care," said NIH director Elias Zerhouni in an agency press release. "Through the consortium, we are better able to leverage expertise and resources across the CTSA institutions, and ultimately maximize NIH's investment in basic research, which should remain a top priority." The 2008 CSTA grants will fund genetics and genomics research projects, studies on pediatric diseases, and infection risk research, among other work. You can peruse the full list of 2008 CSTA awardees linkurl:here.;http://www.ncrr.nih.gov/clinical_research_resources/clinical_and_translational_science_awards/consortium_directory/

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