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More Calif. animal research trouble

Biomedical researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz have again been targeted by animal rights activists opposed to their use of experimental laboratory animals. According to the linkurl:__Santa Cruz Sentinel__,;http://www.scsextra.com/story.php?sid=78460 nearly a dozen threatening pamphlets containing the names, home addresses, phone numbers, and photos of several scientists turned up in a coffee shop in the seaside town on Tuesday (July 29) night. The pamphlets read, in part: "A

By | August 1, 2008

Biomedical researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz have again been targeted by animal rights activists opposed to their use of experimental laboratory animals. According to the linkurl:__Santa Cruz Sentinel__,;http://www.scsextra.com/story.php?sid=78460 nearly a dozen threatening pamphlets containing the names, home addresses, phone numbers, and photos of several scientists turned up in a coffee shop in the seaside town on Tuesday (July 29) night. The pamphlets read, in part: "Animal abusers everywhere beware; we know where you live; we know where you work; we will never back down until you end your abuse." Santa Cruz police told the __Sentinel__ that they are working to verify that the personal information on the pamphlets is correct and that they do not know who left the fliers at the coffee shop. A UCSC spokesperson told the paper that the school is notifying employees whose names and information appeared on the pamphlets. This follows an linkurl:attack;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/54379/ on a UCSC scientist who studies breast cancer and neurological disorders back in February.
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