Flooding disclosed at virus lab

A linkurl:pathogen lab;http://www.vet.uga.edu/ahrc/index.php at the University of Georgia which aims to work with viruses such as SARS and avian influenza has been temporarily closed after two flooding incidents this fall. The first flood occurred on September 24 during the first of a series of studies on a cattle virus called vesicular stomatitis, according to the linkurl:Atlanta Journal Constitution.;http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/metro/stories//2008/11/02/lab_1102_2DOT.html?cxntlid=homepa

By | November 3, 2008

A linkurl:pathogen lab;http://www.vet.uga.edu/ahrc/index.php at the University of Georgia which aims to work with viruses such as SARS and avian influenza has been temporarily closed after two flooding incidents this fall. The first flood occurred on September 24 during the first of a series of studies on a cattle virus called vesicular stomatitis, according to the linkurl:Atlanta Journal Constitution.;http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/metro/stories//2008/11/02/lab_1102_2DOT.html?cxntlid=homepage_tab_newstab About 5-10 gallons of water escaped from the secure lab into the basement through an improperly closed sterilizer door. However, the cattle from the experiment had not yet been infected, so the flood water contained no contaminants and posed no danger to workers or the community. The second flood occurred on October 2, but in that case the water did not leak out of the lab. However, officials acknowledged that the biocontainment breach is a problem, and the lab will remain closed until flood sensors are installed and other fixes are made. The lab, which was meant to open in 1999, needed major reconstruction before experiments finally began in 2006, according to the linkurl:Chronicle of Higher Education.;http://chronicle.com/news/article/5433/u-of-georgia-germ-research-lab-is-closed-after-flooding-incidents The institution is linkurl:in the running;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/54670/ for a $500 million Department of Homeland Security grant to build a national high containment pathogen facility.

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