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Video journal goes closed access

The__ linkurl:Journal of Visualized Experiments;http://www.jove.com __(JoVE), the first life sciences video methods journal, moved from an open access publishing model to paid subscription status last week (Apr. 2) in order to cover its costs of operations. The journal, which has released more 300 video-protocol "articles," had been open access since its launch in October 2006. But citing the higher than usual costs associated with video production and the supporting technological infrastructur

By | April 6, 2009

The__ linkurl:Journal of Visualized Experiments;http://www.jove.com __(JoVE), the first life sciences video methods journal, moved from an open access publishing model to paid subscription status last week (Apr. 2) in order to cover its costs of operations.
The journal, which has released more 300 video-protocol "articles," had been open access since its launch in October 2006. But citing the higher than usual costs associated with video production and the supporting technological infrastructure, JoVE quietly announced its change in business model through the blogosphere on Apr. 1 -- a day before the change took effect. "To continue the [open access] approach, we would have to ask academic labs to pay us $6000 per video to cover our operation costs, and that's simply not possible today," linkurl:Moshe Pritsker,;http://www.jove.com/index/Team.stp CEO and editor-in-chief of JoVE, told __The Scientist__. "We like open access, we just can't survive on it." JoVE is now selling institutional linkurl:subscriptions;http://www.jove.com/index/Subscribe.stp that range from $1,000 per year for small colleges to $2,400 per year for large research universities. Pritsker said that "up to 10" institutions had signed up in the past week, including Harvard University, Wellesley College, and the University of California, Davis. Individuals can also buy $19 daily and $99 monthly subscriptions, as well as obtain free one-day trial access. Pritsker expects JoVE to have 300 to 400 institutional subscribers within three years, which would represent a "pull even situation," he said. The journal will continue to charge $1,500 in author fees, although researchers can pay an extra $1,500 to make their publications freely and openly available. "I can't say I'm terribly surprised," David Crotty, the executive editor of linkurl:Cold Spring Harbor Protocols,;http://cshprotocols.cshlp.org/ wrote on his linkurl:Bench Marks;http://www.cshblogs.org/cshprotocols/2009/04/02/jove-ends-open-access/ blog. "JoVE set themselves a monumental task, trying to break ground with a new type of science publishing and at the same time trying to do so with an unproven business model. Doing both together was perhaps a bit too ambitious."
**__Related stories:__***linkurl:Online methods videos go mainstream;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/54364/
[22nd February 2008]*linkurl:Online videos catch on;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/53500/
[22nd August 2007]*linkurl:Ready for your closeup?;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/37167/
[4th December 2006]
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Comments

Avatar of: Michael Holloway

Michael Holloway

Posts: 55

April 7, 2009

Never saw it before, and now I can guarantee that I never will.
Avatar of: David Weinberg

David Weinberg

Posts: 3

April 9, 2009

What needs to happen is to have everyone who ever submitted a video to this site resubmit to a public site like Youtube, Howto, ITunesU, etc. We live in a global age - information SHOULD be open access.
Avatar of: anonymous poster

anonymous poster

Posts: 5

April 9, 2009

That's too bad. I used to receive occassional emails from the journal with links to articles of interest. Really good content and the video was perfect for learning newly-developed techniques.

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