Bird boogies for science

Everybody, yeah.Rock your body, yeah.Everybody, yeah.Rock your body right.Snowball's back, alright. linkurl:Snowball,;http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N7IZmRnAo6s the dancing cockatoo of YouTube fame, made an encore performance last Saturday (June 13) at the linkurl:World Science Festival;http://www.worldsciencefestival.com as part of__ linkurl:Avian Einsteins,;http://www.worldsciencefestival.com/2009/avian-einsteins __a panel discussion on the parallels between bird and human brains. Joined by s

By | June 18, 2009

Everybody, yeah.
Rock your body, yeah.
Everybody, yeah.
Rock your body right.
Snowball's back, alright. linkurl:Snowball,;http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N7IZmRnAo6s the dancing cockatoo of YouTube fame, made an encore performance last Saturday (June 13) at the linkurl:World Science Festival;http://www.worldsciencefestival.com as part of__ linkurl:Avian Einsteins,;http://www.worldsciencefestival.com/2009/avian-einsteins __a panel discussion on the parallels between bird and human brains. Joined by several of the world's leading bird biologists -- including Duke University's linkurl:Erich Jarvis,;http://www.jarvislab.net University of Cambridge's linkurl:Nicola Clayton,;http://www.psychol.cam.ac.uk/pages/staffweb/clayton Brandeis University's linkurl:Irene Pepperberg,;http://www.brandeis.edu/facguide/person.html?emplid=2d3923e829d95e3849ac8001f5c5fa254b5cf400 and City College New York's linkurl:Ofer Tchernichovski;http://ofer.sci.ccny.cuny.edu -- Snowball boogied to his favorite song, __Everybody__ by the linkurl:Backstreet Boys.;http://blog.backstreetboys.com/ Last month, researchers at the Neurosciences Institute in San Diego, Calif., manipulated the tune's tempo and linkurl:showed;http://www.cell.com/current-biology/abstract/S0960-9822(09)00890-2] that the sulphur-crested cockatoo could adjust its dancing rhythm to different beats; the first known non-human to exhibit that skill. You can watch Snowball and all the panelists shaking their tail feathers at New York University's Skirball Center here:
**__Related stories:__***linkurl:Watching wisdom;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/55761/
[12th June 2009]*linkurl:PhDs (People Having Dance-offs);http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/55214/
[21st November 2008]*linkurl:Individuality, evolution, and dancing;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/65/
[13th June 2005]

Comments

Avatar of: anonymous poster

anonymous poster

Posts: 29

June 18, 2009

The bird in the video watches his owner very carefully, and appears to mimic her movements. Has he been observed to dance to music, respond to rhythm changes, etc. in the absence of a nearby person (i.e., without visual cues)?
Avatar of: Elie Dolgin

Elie Dolgin

Posts: 4

June 18, 2009

Irena Schulz, Snowball's owner and the founder of Bird Lovers Only Rescue Service, addressed your very question at the event on Saturday. She said that Snowball will actively dance without her; in fact, she said the bird has better rhythm than most humans and often gets thrown off by Schulz's off-tempo moves. The reason she was dancing with him was to encourage Snowball in front of the audience because she wanted to ensure that he didn't disappoint. She added that she and her research colleagues are currently investigating the importance of the social feedback in triggering Snowball's feathered fandango. They plan to let him boogie alone, with verbal encouragement only, and in tango with Schulz to see if there's a difference. So keep your eye out for the cockatoo's next viral video!\n\nElie Dolgin, Associate Editor

Popular Now

  1. Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal
    News & Opinion Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal

    My “colleagues” and I at the fictitious Arthur Vandelay Urological Research Institute were surprised to find our bogus “uromycitisis” case report swiftly accepted, with only minor revisions requested.

  2. Consilience, Episode 3: Cancer, Obscured
  3. A History of Screening for Natural Products to Fight Cancer
  4. March for Science: Dispatches from Washington, DC
AAAS