Retracted: stem cell paper

A journal editor has linkurl:retracted;http://www.liebertonline.com/doi/pdfplus/10.1089/scd.2009.0063 a linkurl:paper published this month;http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19583494?ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum that showed sperm could be made from human embryonic stem cells, claiming the authors plagiarized portions of the paper. According to linkurl:ScienceInsider,;http://blogs.sciencemag.org/scienceinsider/2009/

By | July 29, 2009

A journal editor has linkurl:retracted;http://www.liebertonline.com/doi/pdfplus/10.1089/scd.2009.0063 a linkurl:paper published this month;http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19583494?ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum that showed sperm could be made from human embryonic stem cells, claiming the authors plagiarized portions of the paper. According to linkurl:ScienceInsider,;http://blogs.sciencemag.org/scienceinsider/2009/07/journal-editor.html Graham Parker, editor-in-chief of Stem Cells and Development, was told soon after the article appeared that it contained portions of a linkurl:2007 review article;http://www.biolreprod.org/cgi/content/full/76/4/546 in Biology of Reproduction. Parker confronted the first author, Karim Nayernia of Newcastle University, who said the allegedly plagiarized portions of the paper were inserted by a postdoc. Parker told ScienceInsider he did not believe it was an innocent mistake, so he decided to retract the article.
**__Related stories:__***linkurl:Nature to retract plant study;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/55273/
[9th December 2008]*linkurl:Life after fraud;http://www.the-scientist.com/2009/07/1/28/1/
[July 2009]*linkurl:Adult stem cell figure retracted;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/home/53279/
[13th June 2007]

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