27 more hESC lines head for OK

Twenty-seven human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines are ethically derived and should be approved for use in research funded by the US linkurl:National Institutes of Health;http://www.nih.gov/ (NIH), a committee advising the NIH director linkurl:recommended today (December 4).;http://acd.od.nih.gov/agendas/Tab-1-Agenda-FINAL.pdf These findings come just two days after the approval of the first 13 lines linkurl:earlier this week.;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/56196/ Human embryonic st

By | December 4, 2009

Twenty-seven human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines are ethically derived and should be approved for use in research funded by the US linkurl:National Institutes of Health;http://www.nih.gov/ (NIH), a committee advising the NIH director linkurl:recommended today (December 4).;http://acd.od.nih.gov/agendas/Tab-1-Agenda-FINAL.pdf These findings come just two days after the approval of the first 13 lines linkurl:earlier this week.;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/56196/
Human embryonic stem cells
Image: Wikimedia commons,
Nissim Benvenisty
There was one provision, though: The funding must be limited to projects that follow the precise wording in the consent forms, which states the embryos will be used for research on embryonic development of endoderm with a focus on pancreatic beta cell formation. The 27 lines were all part of a single submission from Harvard University, where researchers have been using them for a variety of projects. The Harvard IRB had determined the cells could be used more broadly than stated in the consent forms. A 28th line from the same submission was not recommended for NIH approval because the consent was received during a lapse in Harvard's IRB. The review of the Harvard lines raises an issue that's likely to come up again: how to determine whether submitted lines should be approved only for research specified in the consent forms, or for broader use. The committee asked the NIH to prepare guidelines addressing this issue for future decisions.
**__Related stories:__***linkurl: NIH OKs 13 stem cell lines;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/56196/
[2nd December 2009]*linkurl:NIH picks stem cell panel;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/55991/
[21st September 2009]*linkurl:Two stem cell lines lead studies;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/55885/
[12th August 2009]*linkurl:NIH loosens stem cell consent rules;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/55814/
[6th July 2009]

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