Anatomy of C. Difficile

Clostridium difficile is a spore-forming, gram-positive bacterium that can cause disease when ingested. 

By | June 2, 2011

Infographic: Anatomy of C. Difficile
View full size JPG | PDF
LUCY READING - IKKANDA

Clostridium difficile is a spore-forming, gram-positive bacterium that can cause disease when ingested. While stomach acids kill most of the bacteria, the spores can withstand the harsh gastric environment, passing through to the intestines where they germinate and latch onto the epithelial cells lining the gut. Once attached, the bacteria produce toxins that attack the colon lining, causing abdominal pain and diarrhea. A newly emerged hypervirulent strain of C. difficile produces robust amounts of toxins, and a greater percentage of the hypervirulent bacteria produce spores, increasing the bacterial load in the bowel of the patient as well as the number of spores that pass into the environment, where they can be spread to other individuals. The hypervirulent C. difficile strain also produces stickier surface-layer proteins, which enhance the bacterium’s ability to attach to gut and environmental surfaces, making it more difficult to kill with traditional treatments.

Read the Full Story

Advertisement

Add a Comment

Avatar of: You

You

Processing...
Processing...

Sign In with your LabX Media Group Passport to leave a comment

Not a member? Register Now!

LabX Media Group Passport Logo

Popular Now

  1. NYU Halts Studies, Suspends Investigator
    The Nutshell NYU Halts Studies, Suspends Investigator

    Experiments conducted at the New York University School of Medicine violated several research standards, according to US Food and Drug Administration investigators.

  2. Exercise-Induced Muscle Factor Promotes Memory
  3. The Meaning of Pupil Dilation
    Daily News The Meaning of Pupil Dilation

    Scientists are using pupil measurements to study a wide range of psychological processes and to get a glimpse into the mind.

  4. Brexit’s Effects on Science