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Open and growing

Almost two decades since open access began, the upward trend in free journal publishing continues.

By | June 22, 2011

VMENKOV / WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

The number of new open access articles is growing at a rate of 30 percent per year since the year 2000, according to a study published last week in the open access journal PLoS ONE, in contrast to a 3.5 percent growth in overall journal publishing.  Some hail the results as evidence that open access is a successful business model. Nature Publishing Group, for example, recently announced its foray into open access with its new journal Scientific Reports, which like PLoS ONE, will publish peer-reviewed articles in all areas of science. But others say that a growth rate of 30 percent per year only highlights how far there is yet to go. "The rate is much too low for the needs of research," Stevan Harnad, at the University of Southampton, told Nature. According to the PLoS authors, less than 10 percent of all articles published are open access.

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Avatar of: Stevan Harnad

Stevan Harnad

Posts: 6

June 22, 2011

(Duplicate posting removed -- SH)

Avatar of: Stevan Harnad

Stevan Harnad

Posts: 6

June 22, 2011

THE GREEN/GOLD CONFUSION, YET AGAIN…

No, it is not "less than 10 percent of all articles published are open access."

It is "less than 10 percent of all journal articles per year are being published in an open access journal today" (Gold OA). 

That's the percentage that had been growing by 30% (of the preceding year's Gold OA) per year since 2000, and has slowed to 20% per year since 2005.

At the 30% growth rate, Gold OA won't reach 100% till the year 2022, and at the 20% rate, it won't reach 100% till 2029.

But there's also Green OA self-archiving -- by authors, of their articles published in non-OA journals (still the vast majority). 

The percent Green OA today is 20% -- twice as much as Gold OA. 

But Gold + Green still only add up to 30% total OA today. 

That's far too little, and the growth rate is far too slow.

Gold OA growth is in the hands of publishers. There's nothing the research community can do to accelerate it.

But Green OA growth is in the hands of the research community: Universities and researchers funders can mandate that their researchers self-archive their articles in their institutional repository.

Green OA mandates triple Green OA from 20% to 60% within a few years of adoption, and then keep steadily climbing toward 100%. 

So far only about 150 universities (including Harvard, MIT, and UCL) and about 50 funders (including NIH, RCUK and ERC) have mandated Green OA (see ROARMAP).

But that's where the real scope for rapid OA growth lies.

See Richard Poynder's "Open Access by the Numbers" for details.
http://poynder.blogspot.com/20...

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

June 22, 2011

(Duplicate posting removed -- SH)

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

June 22, 2011

THE GREEN/GOLD CONFUSION, YET AGAIN…

No, it is not "less than 10 percent of all articles published are open access."

It is "less than 10 percent of all journal articles per year are being published in an open access journal today" (Gold OA). 

That's the percentage that had been growing by 30% (of the preceding year's Gold OA) per year since 2000, and has slowed to 20% per year since 2005.

At the 30% growth rate, Gold OA won't reach 100% till the year 2022, and at the 20% rate, it won't reach 100% till 2029.

But there's also Green OA self-archiving -- by authors, of their articles published in non-OA journals (still the vast majority). 

The percent Green OA today is 20% -- twice as much as Gold OA. 

But Gold + Green still only add up to 30% total OA today. 

That's far too little, and the growth rate is far too slow.

Gold OA growth is in the hands of publishers. There's nothing the research community can do to accelerate it.

But Green OA growth is in the hands of the research community: Universities and researchers funders can mandate that their researchers self-archive their articles in their institutional repository.

Green OA mandates triple Green OA from 20% to 60% within a few years of adoption, and then keep steadily climbing toward 100%. 

So far only about 150 universities (including Harvard, MIT, and UCL) and about 50 funders (including NIH, RCUK and ERC) have mandated Green OA (see ROARMAP).

But that's where the real scope for rapid OA growth lies.

See Richard Poynder's "Open Access by the Numbers" for details.
http://poynder.blogspot.com/20...

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

June 22, 2011

(Duplicate posting removed -- SH)

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

June 22, 2011

THE GREEN/GOLD CONFUSION, YET AGAIN…

No, it is not "less than 10 percent of all articles published are open access."

It is "less than 10 percent of all journal articles per year are being published in an open access journal today" (Gold OA). 

That's the percentage that had been growing by 30% (of the preceding year's Gold OA) per year since 2000, and has slowed to 20% per year since 2005.

At the 30% growth rate, Gold OA won't reach 100% till the year 2022, and at the 20% rate, it won't reach 100% till 2029.

But there's also Green OA self-archiving -- by authors, of their articles published in non-OA journals (still the vast majority). 

The percent Green OA today is 20% -- twice as much as Gold OA. 

But Gold + Green still only add up to 30% total OA today. 

That's far too little, and the growth rate is far too slow.

Gold OA growth is in the hands of publishers. There's nothing the research community can do to accelerate it.

But Green OA growth is in the hands of the research community: Universities and researchers funders can mandate that their researchers self-archive their articles in their institutional repository.

Green OA mandates triple Green OA from 20% to 60% within a few years of adoption, and then keep steadily climbing toward 100%. 

So far only about 150 universities (including Harvard, MIT, and UCL) and about 50 funders (including NIH, RCUK and ERC) have mandated Green OA (see ROARMAP).

But that's where the real scope for rapid OA growth lies.

See Richard Poynder's "Open Access by the Numbers" for details.
http://poynder.blogspot.com/20...

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