Stem Cells Help Regain Memory

For brain cancer patients suffering from cognitive dysfunction due to radiation treatment, stem cells may offer relief.

By | July 14, 2011

WELLCOME IMAGES, BENEDICT CAMPBELL

While radiation therapy is often used to keep brain cancer at bay, it can cause serious long-term damage in the form of learning deficits and memory loss. However, a team of researchers at the University of California, Irvine, found that human neural stem cells injected into radiation-treated rats can help reverse this damage. After transplantation, the stem cells migrated throughout the hippocampus and developed into new neurons, as well as supporting brain cells, including astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. "While much work remains, a clinical trial analyzing the safety of such approaches may be possible within a few years,” said radiation oncologist and author of the paper, Charles Limoli, in a press release. The results will appear in the July 15 issue of Cancer Research.

Add a Comment

Avatar of: You

You

Processing...
Processing...

Sign In with your LabX Media Group Passport to leave a comment

Not a member? Register Now!

LabX Media Group Passport Logo

Popular Now

  1. Publishers’ Legal Action Advances Against Sci-Hub
  2. How Microbes May Influence Our Behavior
  3. Metabolomics Data Under Scrutiny
    Daily News Metabolomics Data Under Scrutiny

    Out of 25,000 features originally detected by metabolic profiling of E. coli, fewer than 1,000 represent unique metabolites, a study finds.

  4. Sexual Touch Promotes Early Puberty
    Daily News Sexual Touch Promotes Early Puberty

    The brains and bodies of young female rats can be accelerated into puberty by the presence of an older male or by stimulation of the genitals.

AAAS