Google Memory

A study reveals that people may rely on the internet to store information rather than their own brains.

By | July 15, 2011

WIKIMEDIA COMMONS, CAIGUANHAO

Easy access to the Internet has resulted in less storage of facts in our brains, but a better memory of where to search for the answer, according to a study published yesterday (July 14) in Science Express.

In a series of experiments on 46 college students, researchers found that the test group was 40 percent more likely to remember information when they were told they would not be able to look it up later. Conversely, those who were told they would have access to the computer folder in which it was stored were more likely to remember how to locate the folder than the information itself.

The practice of storing information outside of the brain and remembering its location, but not the details, is not a new thing. “It’s very similar to how we use people in our lives,” Columbia University psychologist Elizabeth Sparrow told Wired Science. People serve as repositories of information that allow an individual access to a greater amount of information than they could store in their brain, she explained, and “the Internet is really just an interface with a lot of other people.”

Add a Comment

Avatar of: You

You

Processing...
Processing...

Sign In with your LabX Media Group Passport to leave a comment

Not a member? Register Now!

LabX Media Group Passport Logo

Popular Now

  1. How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine
  2. Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists
    The Nutshell Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

    According to citation statistics, researchers behind programmed cell death pathways and CRISPR/Cas9 are among those in line for Nobel Prizes this year.

  3. Sequencing Reveals Genomic Diversity of the Human Brain
  4. Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts
    The Nutshell Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts

    An open-access journal is trialing a peer-review process in which reviewers do not have access to the results or discussion sections of submitted papers.

RayBiotech