NYC Lures Universities to Build Science Facility

The city will provide cheap real estate and up to $100 million for a science and engineering campus.

By | July 21, 2011

Aerial view of Governors Island, one of the proposed building sitesWIKIMEDIA COMMONS, GRYFFINDOR

In an effort to generate revenue and jobs, New York City is inviting universities to build a science and tech facility within city limits, Mayor Michael Bloomberg said during a speech on Tuesday (July 19). The city is offering “prime New York City real estate—at virtually no cost—plus up to $100-million in infrastructure upgrades, in exchange for a university’s commitment to build or expand a world-class science and engineering campus here in our city,” Bloomberg said, adding that building sites are available at three “underutilized” locations in NYC: Governors Island, the Navy Yard, and Roosevelt Island.

The mayor estimated that in its first 30 years, an applied science campus could spin-off 400 new companies and create more than 22,000 permanent jobs.

As of March, more than two dozen organizations, including international applicants, had submitted proposals for the project. A winning proposal and location will be picked by the end of this year, according to the Chronicle of Higher Education.

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