Google Launches Citation Stats

Another free academic citation tracking service adds more competition to the field.

By | August 3, 2011

WIKIMEDIA COMMONS, QUADELL

Google Scholar, a free, centralized portal for searching for academic literature from a wide variety of publishers, added a new feature last month—Google Scholar Citations (GSC). GSC will allow researchers to track who cites their papers and how often they are cited over time. By creating a public profile, an author’s citation data will also appear in Google Scholar search results when a user searches for his or her name. In addition, the service promises to provide “h-index” values that reflect a researcher’s productivity and impact in their field, Nature reported yesterday (August 2).

Thomson Reuters' Web of Knowledge and Elsevier's Scopus database already offer such services, but for a fee, as does Microsoft, which launched its free-of-charge Academic Search (MAS) two years ago. MAS has more tools than GSC including citation network maps which show connections between different research specialties, but Google Scholar’s database is much larger, including citations not only from journals, but from books, theses, and conference presentations.

“It is clear that the commercial citation index producers will be more and more in competition with these free-access facilities," Ton Van Raan, a bibliometrics expert at Leiden University, the Netherlands, told Nature.

Add a Comment

Avatar of: You

You

Processing...
Processing...

Sign In with your LabX Media Group Passport to leave a comment

Not a member? Register Now!

LabX Media Group Passport Logo

Comments

Avatar of: Azad Najafov

Azad Najafov

Posts: 4

August 3, 2011

It will be very useful not only for scientist, but also for any who publishes in the Internet.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

August 3, 2011

It will be very useful not only for scientist, but also for any who publishes in the Internet.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

August 3, 2011

It will be very useful not only for scientist, but also for any who publishes in the Internet.

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  3. Mutation Linked to Longer Life Span in Men
  4. Gut Feeling
    Daily News Gut Feeling

    Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

AAAS