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Haeckel’s Radiolarians

After completing his studies in medicine and biology, Prussian naturalist Ernst Haeckel set off for Italy in 1859, where, in addition to painting landscapes, he spent the climactic months of his stay glued to his microscope observing and sketching.

By | August 1, 2011

Enrst Haeckel (1834-1919) portrait 
NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE
RADIOLARIA ILLUSTRATIONS FROM WIKIPEDIA

Enrst Haeckel (1834-1919) portrait NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE RADIOLARIA ILLUSTRATIONS FROM WIKIPEDIA

Haeckel’s Radiolarians Image Gallery

After completing his studies in medicine and biology, Prussian naturalist Ernst Haeckel set off for Italy in 1859, where, in addition to painting landscapes, he spent the climactic months of his stay glued to his microscope observing and sketching radiolaria—protozoa encased in delicately ornate silica skeletons—that he collected off the Italian coast and sent back to Berlin. Over the next seven years, he went on to discover and name more than 150 new species of radiolarians, and arrived at some fundamental ideas about biology and evolution.

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Avatar of: John Collins

Anonymous

August 11, 2011

Haeckel unfortunately in the absence knowledge which we now have from the human genome project came to conclusions that what we now consider as 'the human race' constituted in fact several distinct races stemming from various originally speechless ape-men each now having its own distinct language. Those with the most highly developed language were considered superior. There is no doubt that Haeckel considered the semitic races to be the most superior and thus the most highly developed. This had tragic consequences in the following 70 or so years in Europe particularly in Germany where this theory was misused to support racially based genocide on a massive scale..... but looking at this tree from Australia maybe inverts the perspective.

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Posts: 0

August 11, 2011

Haeckel unfortunately in the absence knowledge which we now have from the human genome project came to conclusions that what we now consider as 'the human race' constituted in fact several distinct races stemming from various originally speechless ape-men each now having its own distinct language. Those with the most highly developed language were considered superior. There is no doubt that Haeckel considered the semitic races to be the most superior and thus the most highly developed. This had tragic consequences in the following 70 or so years in Europe particularly in Germany where this theory was misused to support racially based genocide on a massive scale..... but looking at this tree from Australia maybe inverts the perspective.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

August 11, 2011

Haeckel unfortunately in the absence knowledge which we now have from the human genome project came to conclusions that what we now consider as 'the human race' constituted in fact several distinct races stemming from various originally speechless ape-men each now having its own distinct language. Those with the most highly developed language were considered superior. There is no doubt that Haeckel considered the semitic races to be the most superior and thus the most highly developed. This had tragic consequences in the following 70 or so years in Europe particularly in Germany where this theory was misused to support racially based genocide on a massive scale..... but looking at this tree from Australia maybe inverts the perspective.

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Posts: 0

August 13, 2011

Otro lamentable caso de sociobiología... tratando de justificar ideologías con temas que en la naturaleza no son como las vieron.

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Posts: 0

August 13, 2011

Otro lamentable caso de sociobiología... tratando de justificar ideologías con temas que en la naturaleza no son como las vieron.

Avatar of: Mariana Nuñez

Mariana Nuñez

Posts: 1457

August 13, 2011

Otro lamentable caso de sociobiología... tratando de justificar ideologías con temas que en la naturaleza no son como las vieron.

Avatar of: Schwerin

Anonymous

August 16, 2011

Haeckel was anticipated at least 35 years earlier by the French naturalist/explorer
Alcide d'Orbigny who not only sketched the radiolarian organisms he discovered in the seawater of his native La Rochelle, but he also created macro-scale models of many of them.  These models are still preserved in Paris at the Jardin des Plantes.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

August 16, 2011

Haeckel was anticipated at least 35 years earlier by the French naturalist/explorer
Alcide d'Orbigny who not only sketched the radiolarian organisms he discovered in the seawater of his native La Rochelle, but he also created macro-scale models of many of them.  These models are still preserved in Paris at the Jardin des Plantes.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

August 16, 2011

Haeckel was anticipated at least 35 years earlier by the French naturalist/explorer
Alcide d'Orbigny who not only sketched the radiolarian organisms he discovered in the seawater of his native La Rochelle, but he also created macro-scale models of many of them.  These models are still preserved in Paris at the Jardin des Plantes.

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Posts: 0

August 17, 2011

He is, THE most interesting man (not) alive.

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Posts: 0

August 17, 2011

He is, THE most interesting man (not) alive.

Avatar of: Anon

Anonymous

August 17, 2011

He is, THE most interesting man (not) alive.

Avatar of: shrinkess

shrinkess

Posts: 1

August 29, 2011

wow!

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Posts: 0

August 29, 2011

wow!

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Posts: 0

August 29, 2011

wow!

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Posts: 0

September 2, 2011

He doesn't always drink beer, but when he does, I bet he prefers Dos Equis :)

Avatar of: Bob

Anonymous

September 2, 2011

He doesn't always drink beer, but when he does, I bet he prefers Dos Equis :)

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 2, 2011

He doesn't always drink beer, but when he does, I bet he prefers Dos Equis :)

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