Advertisement

Beer Yeast Identified

A new yeast species found in Patagonia appears to be the missing half of the long-used lager yeast.

By | August 23, 2011

FLICKR, EPICBEER

In the beech woodlands of Northwestern Patagonia, researchers identified the long-enigmatic wild yeast species that contributed to the domesticated hybrid yeast used to brew lager beers since the 15th century.

The complete identity of the yeast most commonly used to brew lager beers has long been a mystery to scientists, known only as a hybrid between an ale-yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and an unidentified, cold-tolerant species. To identify the unknown component of the hybrid species, known as S. pastorianus, microbiologist José Paulo Sampaio of the Universidade Nova de Lisboa in Portugal and his colleagues compared its genome with many yeast species of the Patagonian forests, and found a new species whose draft genome was 99.5 percent identical to the non-S. cerevisiae portion of the lager yeast, according to the paper published yesterday (August 22) in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Furthermore, the genome contained specific differences in the genes involved in sugar and sulfite metabolism that were critical for the yeast’s domestication for brewing lagers, ScienceNOW reports.

The authors dubbed the new species S. eubayanus, and  say the discovery could unveil additional differences, such as gene regulation changes, that help beer fanatics create even more ideal yeasts for brewing.

Add a Comment

Avatar of: You

You

Processing...
Processing...

Sign In with your LabX Media Group Passport to leave a comment

Not a member? Register Now!

LabX Media Group Passport Logo

Comments

Avatar of: Brian Hanley

Brian Hanley

Posts: 66

August 23, 2011

And the yeast rush is on! :-) 

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

August 23, 2011

And the yeast rush is on! :-) 

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

August 23, 2011

And the yeast rush is on! :-) 

Advertisement
QIAGEN ingenuity
QIAGEN ingenuity

Popular Now

  1. The Zombie Literature
    Features The Zombie Literature

    Retractions are on the rise. But reams of flawed research papers persist in the scientific literature. Is it time to change the way papers are published?

  2. A Scrambled Mess
    Features A Scrambled Mess

    Why do so many human eggs have the wrong number of chromosomes?

  3. The Two Faces of Fish Oil
    Notebook The Two Faces of Fish Oil

    The discovery of a tumor-protecting role for a fatty acid found in fish oil has sparked debate about the product’s safety.

  4. Bacterium Blocks Zika’s Spread
Advertisement
Diagenode
Diagenode
Advertisement
RayBioTech