European and South African Scientists Share Resources

A cooperative agreement allows South African scientists to participate in European Molecular Biology programs.

By | September 23, 2011

NATIONAL CENTER FOR RESEARCH RESOURCES

South Africa and the European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO), a European life sciences organization, have reached a three-year agreement to allow South African scientists to participate in activities and workshops in EMBO.

As part of the agreement, South African scientists are allowed to apply for short and long-term fellowships in states that participate in the European Molecular Biology Conference, which funds EMBO. The goal is to provide the fellows with a new set of tools and a network for collaborative projects.  In turn, scientists from the European Union will be allowed to travel to South Africa on fellowship.

South African scientists will also have access to funding for global exchange lecture courses at two or three South African institutions. This is the second time that South Africa and EMBO have reached such an agreement. The first agreement was reached in 2008.

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Avatar of: Tom Hennessy

Tom Hennessy

Posts: 1457

September 24, 2011

Let's hope they don't funnel alot of cash to their research which could be better used elsewhere. I am not really sure how biochemists believe that CREATING whole new facilities will enhance the ability to 'discover'. They haven't been able to do it until now and they somehow expect newer digs to do it ? It's newer digs and THAT is all they are. Imho.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 24, 2011

Let's hope they don't funnel alot of cash to their research which could be better used elsewhere. I am not really sure how biochemists believe that CREATING whole new facilities will enhance the ability to 'discover'. They haven't been able to do it until now and they somehow expect newer digs to do it ? It's newer digs and THAT is all they are. Imho.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 24, 2011

Let's hope they don't funnel alot of cash to their research which could be better used elsewhere. I am not really sure how biochemists believe that CREATING whole new facilities will enhance the ability to 'discover'. They haven't been able to do it until now and they somehow expect newer digs to do it ? It's newer digs and THAT is all they are. Imho.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 28, 2011

Tom, I've read the snippet 3 times, and see no mention of 'creating whole new facilities'.  Facilitating the exchange of people, ideas and approaches between laboratories seems merely good practice, and something easly achieved with an amenable host lab, an airticket and some cheap, campus accommodation on either end of the exchange.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 28, 2011

Tom, I've read the snippet 3 times, and see no mention of 'creating whole new facilities'.  Facilitating the exchange of people, ideas and approaches between laboratories seems merely good practice, and something easly achieved with an amenable host lab, an airticket and some cheap, campus accommodation on either end of the exchange.

Avatar of: doogsinscotland

Anonymous

September 28, 2011

Tom, I've read the snippet 3 times, and see no mention of 'creating whole new facilities'.  Facilitating the exchange of people, ideas and approaches between laboratories seems merely good practice, and something easly achieved with an amenable host lab, an airticket and some cheap, campus accommodation on either end of the exchange.

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