Plant RNAs Found in Mammals

MicroRNAs from plants accumulate in mammalian blood and tissues, where they can regulate gene expression.

By | September 20, 2011

DREAMSTIME.COM, REWAT WANNASUK

MicroRNAs from common plant crops such as rice and cabbage can be found in the blood and tissues of humans and other plant-eating mammals, according to a study published today in Cell Research. One microRNA in particular, MIR168a, which is highly enriched in rice, was found to inhibit a protein that helps removes low-density lipoprotein (LDL) from the blood, suggesting that microRNAs can influence gene expression across kingdoms.

“This is a very exciting piece of work that suggests that the food we eat may directly regulate gene expression in our bodies,” said Clay Marsh, Director of the Center for Personalized Health Care at the Ohio State University College of Medicine who researches microRNA expression in human blood but who was not involved in the study.

MicroRNAs are, as the name implies, very short RNA sequences (approximately 22 nucleotides in length) discovered in the early 1990s. They are known to modulate gene expression by binding to mRNA, often resulting in inhibition. With the recent discovery that microRNAs circulate the blood by hitching a ride in small membrane-encased particles known as microvesicles (see our July 2011 feature on microvesicles, “Exosome Explosion”), there has been a surge of interest in microRNAs as a novel class of biomarkers for a variety of diseases.

Chen-Yu Zhang, a molecular biologist at Nanjing University in China, was studying the role of circulating microRNAs in health and disease when he discovered that microRNAs are present in other bodily fluids such as milk. This gave him the “crazy idea” that exogenous microRNAs, such as those ingested through the consumption of milk, could also be found circulating in the serum of mammals, he recalled.

To test his hypothesis, Zhang and his team of researchers sequenced the blood microRNAs of 31 healthy Chinese subjects and searched for the presence of plant microRNAs. Because plant microRNAs are structurally different from those of mammals, they react differently to oxidizing agents, and the researchers were able to differentiate the two by treating them with sodium periodate, which oxidizes mammal but not plant microRNAs.

To their surprise, they found about 40 types of plant microRNAs circulating in the subjects’ blood—some of which were found in concentrations that were comparable to major endogenous human microRNAs.

The plant microRNAs with the highest concentrations were MIR156a and MIR168a, both of which are known to be enriched in rice and cruciferous vegetables such as cauliflower, cabbage, and broccoli. Furthermore, the researchers detected the two microRNAs in the blood, lungs, small intestine, and livers of mice, in variable concentrations that significantly increased after the mice were fed raw rice (although cooked rice was also shown to contain intact MIR168a).

Next, the researchers scoured sequence databases for putative target genes of MIR156a and MIR168a and found that MIR168a shared sequence complementarity with approximately 50 mammalian genes. The most highly conserved of these sequences across the animal kingdom was the exon 4 of the low-density lipoprotein receptor adapter protein 1 gene (LDLRAP1).

LDLRAP1 is highly expressed in the liver, where it interacts with the low-density lipoprotein receptor to help remove low-density lipoprotein (LDL), aka “bad” cholesterol, from the blood.

The researchers hypothesized that MIR168a could be taken up by the epithelial cells lining the gastrointestinal tract, packaged into microvesicles, and secreted into the blood stream, where they can make their way to target organs. Once in the liver, MIR168a binds to LDLRAP1 mRNA, reducing the protein levels and ultimately impairing the removal of LDL from the blood.

To test this hypothesis in vitro, the researchers transfected synthetic MIR168a into a human epithelial cell line and collected the secreted microvesicles. When they added these microvesicles to a liver cell line called HepG2, they found that while it did not change the levels of LDLRAP1 mRNA, it did decrease the levels of the actual LDLRAP1 protein.

Likewise, the LDLRAP1 protein level decreased in the livers of live mice 3 to 7 days after eating fresh rice or being injected with synthetic MIR168a—significantly increasing LDL in the blood. When the researchers injected the mice with an RNA sequence that bound to and neutralized MIR168a, the protein and LDL levels returned to normal.

“This microRNA inhibits this protein and increased the plasma LDL levels,” Zhang said. With higher levels of circulating cholesterol, “it can possibly increase the risk of metabolic syndrome,” he added. But more importantly, this research points to a “new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of diseases,” based on the enhancement or inhibition of exogenous microRNAs.

Although the team has still a long way to go in elucidating the mechanisms by which plant microRNAs can regulate gene expression in humans, these initial results promise to increase the understanding of how specific ingredients in food can mediate health and disease, Marsh said.

Indeed, Zhang suspects that this is just one example of many. With time, “I’m confident other people will find more exogenous plant microRNAs that can pass through the GI tract and also have effects on the host physiology,” Zhang said.

L. Zhang, et. al., "Exogenous plant MIR168a specifically targets mammalian LDLRAP1: evidence of cross-kingdom regulation by microRNA," Cell Research, doi:10.1038/cr.2011.158, 2011.

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Comments

Avatar of: Mabrouk A. El-Sharkawy

Anonymous

September 20, 2011

How these findings affect human nutritional systems?

Avatar of: Guest

Anonymous

September 20, 2011

For me, it means I should eat more chocolate before prices skyrocket -- they will either demonstrate its health benefits (driving up demand), or find there is something unhealthful it (increasing its cost due to increased regulation). 

One might point out you use the word "nutritional" in your question.  Blah, blah, blah...

Avatar of: James V. Kohl

Anonymous

September 20, 2011

Tuesday, August 30, 2011 by: S. L. Baker, features writer

(NaturalNews) All regular readers of NaturalNews know that

researchers have discovered chocolate (especially the
organic, not

junked up with additives and sugar type) contains
phytochemicals

which appear to promote good health. But no one has had much
of a

clue about the specifics of some of those benefits on the

cardiovascular system -- until now. Scientists at the
European

Society of Cardiology Congress currently underway in Paris
just

announced that chocolate provides huge protection from heart
disease

as well as stroke.

http://www.naturalnews.com/033...

Avatar of: Basil Hall

Anonymous

September 20, 2011

There is something wrong here. My cholesterol level has never been lower than 5.4 and my triglycerides never lower than 1.8. Recently my Chol. was 5.8 and my trigs. 3.8

Last week, having some broccoli in the fridge, and just harvested some broccoli from the garden, I had a ton of broccoli every night.

Last Friday I had my levels tested. Guess what? My chol. was 4.6 and my trigs. was 1.4 ! ?????

Avatar of: Shi V. Liu

Anonymous

September 20, 2011

This finding suggests that we need to be very careful in spreading transgenic crops when their safety has not yet fully tested.  As a matter of fact, this study has demonstrated a need for expanding the scope of food safety detection measures.

Avatar of: Guest

Anonymous

September 20, 2011

It is
probably to late but your description of the risk is correct.

Avatar of: Paul

Anonymous

September 20, 2011

your comment is irrelevant to the article.

Avatar of: JRS

Anonymous

September 20, 2011

Why is any risk associated with this phenomena greater with transgenic plants than varieties produced via plant breeding?  Traditional breeding, especially to distantly related wild relatives, is more likely to alter microRNA profiles in plants than is the insertion of a single recombinant gene.

Avatar of: Bjorn

Anonymous

September 20, 2011

You are right as GMO always contains a resistance factor that should be avoided unless we want more resistance factors spread horizontally by the food we eat.

Avatar of: Terry Bristol

Anonymous

September 20, 2011

This opens up new avenues of research in understanding the historical record of food remedies – ancient to modern. Similarly in expands the possibilities of understanding nutritional strategies to treat diseases – beyond the existing vitamin knowledge-base. Many inflammatory and auto-immune diseases are not understood – but clearly have relationships to food. Finally, other modern research suggests that pharmaceuticals work differentially in different people. I was involved in research that suggested that our pharmaceutical worked much better in fish eaters than in heavy beef eaters (viz never experimentally confirmed).

Avatar of: Pwyh01

Anonymous

September 20, 2011

It is very interseting.

Avatar of: Anuradha Dube

Anonymous

September 20, 2011

'you are what you eat' this finding validates this saying and brings to fore the role of nutrition gene expression.
It also validates the role of aahaara (food) as claimed by Ayurveda

Avatar of: Marco

Anonymous

September 20, 2011

If you make it vague enough you can claim that it validates any pseudoscience of your liking. Just out of curiosity, how does the periodic table validates the Ayurvedic notion that there only exist five elements? Maybe if only count until boron...

Avatar of: James V. Kohl

Anonymous

September 20, 2011

This important finding in mammals is
predicted by an insect model in which the diet of the honeybee queen and her
pheromones determine everything about the success of the hive including the
neuroanatomy of worker bee brains.

The
honeybee already serves as a model organism for studying human immunity,
disease resistance, allergic reaction, circadian rhythms, antibiotic
resistance, development, mental health, longevity, and diseases of the X
chromosome. Included among these different aspects of eusocial species survival
are learning and memory as well as conditioned responses to sensory stimuli,
like food odors, and the social odors called pheromones. Thus, the
honeybee model also predicts that the behavior of mammals will be influenced by
food odors, nutrition, and pheromones to the same degree that chemical stimuli
influence the behavior of every other species on the planet.

In mammals, of course, the
epigenetic effects of pheromones in the mother's milk are clearer, perhaps even to non-biologists.

Avatar of: Nils Jansma

Anonymous

September 20, 2011

If you really want to start a controversy, one could say that this may validate the Bible’s inference that longevity can be connected to a “tree of life.â€쳌   I am sure that someone will make the connection and open up a whole line of research connected to discovering how what we eat can extend our age.

Avatar of: Paul

Anonymous

September 20, 2011

So I guess eating plants could be counter productive to our health.  So moderation and a balanced diet is key here.

September 20, 2011

This is an important enough and unexpected enough finding that we should not accept it at face value until it has been confirmed in different (independent) laboratories.
 
Oatmeal has been alleged to decrease LDL levels.  I wonder if (assuming  the allegations about oatmeal and microRNAs are both correct in the first place) this might also be via some microRNA mechanism.

Avatar of: Vladimir

Anonymous

September 20, 2011

It would be interesting how the microRNA avoid the nucleases in the gastrointestinal system.

Avatar of: Brian Hanley

Brian Hanley

Posts: 66

September 20, 2011

But curiously, I don't know of a single shred of evidence linking a diet high in rice to heart disease. One would expect one, no? What I am aware of points the other way.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 20, 2011

How these findings affect human nutritional systems?

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 20, 2011

For me, it means I should eat more chocolate before prices skyrocket -- they will either demonstrate its health benefits (driving up demand), or find there is something unhealthful it (increasing its cost due to increased regulation). 

One might point out you use the word "nutritional" in your question.  Blah, blah, blah...

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 20, 2011

Tuesday, August 30, 2011 by: S. L. Baker, features writer

(NaturalNews) All regular readers of NaturalNews know that

researchers have discovered chocolate (especially the
organic, not

junked up with additives and sugar type) contains
phytochemicals

which appear to promote good health. But no one has had much
of a

clue about the specifics of some of those benefits on the

cardiovascular system -- until now. Scientists at the
European

Society of Cardiology Congress currently underway in Paris
just

announced that chocolate provides huge protection from heart
disease

as well as stroke.

http://www.naturalnews.com/033...

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 20, 2011

There is something wrong here. My cholesterol level has never been lower than 5.4 and my triglycerides never lower than 1.8. Recently my Chol. was 5.8 and my trigs. 3.8

Last week, having some broccoli in the fridge, and just harvested some broccoli from the garden, I had a ton of broccoli every night.

Last Friday I had my levels tested. Guess what? My chol. was 4.6 and my trigs. was 1.4 ! ?????

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 20, 2011

This finding suggests that we need to be very careful in spreading transgenic crops when their safety has not yet fully tested.  As a matter of fact, this study has demonstrated a need for expanding the scope of food safety detection measures.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 20, 2011

It is
probably to late but your description of the risk is correct.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 20, 2011

your comment is irrelevant to the article.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 20, 2011

Why is any risk associated with this phenomena greater with transgenic plants than varieties produced via plant breeding?  Traditional breeding, especially to distantly related wild relatives, is more likely to alter microRNA profiles in plants than is the insertion of a single recombinant gene.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 20, 2011

You are right as GMO always contains a resistance factor that should be avoided unless we want more resistance factors spread horizontally by the food we eat.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 20, 2011

This opens up new avenues of research in understanding the historical record of food remedies – ancient to modern. Similarly in expands the possibilities of understanding nutritional strategies to treat diseases – beyond the existing vitamin knowledge-base. Many inflammatory and auto-immune diseases are not understood – but clearly have relationships to food. Finally, other modern research suggests that pharmaceuticals work differentially in different people. I was involved in research that suggested that our pharmaceutical worked much better in fish eaters than in heavy beef eaters (viz never experimentally confirmed).

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 20, 2011

It is very interseting.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 20, 2011

'you are what you eat' this finding validates this saying and brings to fore the role of nutrition gene expression.
It also validates the role of aahaara (food) as claimed by Ayurveda

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 20, 2011

If you make it vague enough you can claim that it validates any pseudoscience of your liking. Just out of curiosity, how does the periodic table validates the Ayurvedic notion that there only exist five elements? Maybe if only count until boron...

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 20, 2011

This important finding in mammals is
predicted by an insect model in which the diet of the honeybee queen and her
pheromones determine everything about the success of the hive including the
neuroanatomy of worker bee brains.

The
honeybee already serves as a model organism for studying human immunity,
disease resistance, allergic reaction, circadian rhythms, antibiotic
resistance, development, mental health, longevity, and diseases of the X
chromosome. Included among these different aspects of eusocial species survival
are learning and memory as well as conditioned responses to sensory stimuli,
like food odors, and the social odors called pheromones. Thus, the
honeybee model also predicts that the behavior of mammals will be influenced by
food odors, nutrition, and pheromones to the same degree that chemical stimuli
influence the behavior of every other species on the planet.

In mammals, of course, the
epigenetic effects of pheromones in the mother's milk are clearer, perhaps even to non-biologists.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 20, 2011

If you really want to start a controversy, one could say that this may validate the Bible’s inference that longevity can be connected to a “tree of life.â€쳌   I am sure that someone will make the connection and open up a whole line of research connected to discovering how what we eat can extend our age.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 20, 2011

So I guess eating plants could be counter productive to our health.  So moderation and a balanced diet is key here.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 20, 2011

This is an important enough and unexpected enough finding that we should not accept it at face value until it has been confirmed in different (independent) laboratories.
 
Oatmeal has been alleged to decrease LDL levels.  I wonder if (assuming  the allegations about oatmeal and microRNAs are both correct in the first place) this might also be via some microRNA mechanism.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 20, 2011

It would be interesting how the microRNA avoid the nucleases in the gastrointestinal system.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 20, 2011

But curiously, I don't know of a single shred of evidence linking a diet high in rice to heart disease. One would expect one, no? What I am aware of points the other way.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 20, 2011

How these findings affect human nutritional systems?

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 20, 2011

For me, it means I should eat more chocolate before prices skyrocket -- they will either demonstrate its health benefits (driving up demand), or find there is something unhealthful it (increasing its cost due to increased regulation). 

One might point out you use the word "nutritional" in your question.  Blah, blah, blah...

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 20, 2011

Tuesday, August 30, 2011 by: S. L. Baker, features writer

(NaturalNews) All regular readers of NaturalNews know that

researchers have discovered chocolate (especially the
organic, not

junked up with additives and sugar type) contains
phytochemicals

which appear to promote good health. But no one has had much
of a

clue about the specifics of some of those benefits on the

cardiovascular system -- until now. Scientists at the
European

Society of Cardiology Congress currently underway in Paris
just

announced that chocolate provides huge protection from heart
disease

as well as stroke.

http://www.naturalnews.com/033...

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 20, 2011

There is something wrong here. My cholesterol level has never been lower than 5.4 and my triglycerides never lower than 1.8. Recently my Chol. was 5.8 and my trigs. 3.8

Last week, having some broccoli in the fridge, and just harvested some broccoli from the garden, I had a ton of broccoli every night.

Last Friday I had my levels tested. Guess what? My chol. was 4.6 and my trigs. was 1.4 ! ?????

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 20, 2011

This finding suggests that we need to be very careful in spreading transgenic crops when their safety has not yet fully tested.  As a matter of fact, this study has demonstrated a need for expanding the scope of food safety detection measures.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 20, 2011

It is
probably to late but your description of the risk is correct.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 20, 2011

your comment is irrelevant to the article.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 20, 2011

Why is any risk associated with this phenomena greater with transgenic plants than varieties produced via plant breeding?  Traditional breeding, especially to distantly related wild relatives, is more likely to alter microRNA profiles in plants than is the insertion of a single recombinant gene.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 20, 2011

You are right as GMO always contains a resistance factor that should be avoided unless we want more resistance factors spread horizontally by the food we eat.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 20, 2011

This opens up new avenues of research in understanding the historical record of food remedies – ancient to modern. Similarly in expands the possibilities of understanding nutritional strategies to treat diseases – beyond the existing vitamin knowledge-base. Many inflammatory and auto-immune diseases are not understood – but clearly have relationships to food. Finally, other modern research suggests that pharmaceuticals work differentially in different people. I was involved in research that suggested that our pharmaceutical worked much better in fish eaters than in heavy beef eaters (viz never experimentally confirmed).

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 20, 2011

It is very interseting.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 20, 2011

'you are what you eat' this finding validates this saying and brings to fore the role of nutrition gene expression.
It also validates the role of aahaara (food) as claimed by Ayurveda

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 20, 2011

If you make it vague enough you can claim that it validates any pseudoscience of your liking. Just out of curiosity, how does the periodic table validates the Ayurvedic notion that there only exist five elements? Maybe if only count until boron...

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 20, 2011

This important finding in mammals is
predicted by an insect model in which the diet of the honeybee queen and her
pheromones determine everything about the success of the hive including the
neuroanatomy of worker bee brains.

The
honeybee already serves as a model organism for studying human immunity,
disease resistance, allergic reaction, circadian rhythms, antibiotic
resistance, development, mental health, longevity, and diseases of the X
chromosome. Included among these different aspects of eusocial species survival
are learning and memory as well as conditioned responses to sensory stimuli,
like food odors, and the social odors called pheromones. Thus, the
honeybee model also predicts that the behavior of mammals will be influenced by
food odors, nutrition, and pheromones to the same degree that chemical stimuli
influence the behavior of every other species on the planet.

In mammals, of course, the
epigenetic effects of pheromones in the mother's milk are clearer, perhaps even to non-biologists.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 20, 2011

If you really want to start a controversy, one could say that this may validate the Bible’s inference that longevity can be connected to a “tree of life.â€쳌   I am sure that someone will make the connection and open up a whole line of research connected to discovering how what we eat can extend our age.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 20, 2011

So I guess eating plants could be counter productive to our health.  So moderation and a balanced diet is key here.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 20, 2011

This is an important enough and unexpected enough finding that we should not accept it at face value until it has been confirmed in different (independent) laboratories.
 
Oatmeal has been alleged to decrease LDL levels.  I wonder if (assuming  the allegations about oatmeal and microRNAs are both correct in the first place) this might also be via some microRNA mechanism.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 20, 2011

It would be interesting how the microRNA avoid the nucleases in the gastrointestinal system.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 20, 2011

But curiously, I don't know of a single shred of evidence linking a diet high in rice to heart disease. One would expect one, no? What I am aware of points the other way.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 21, 2011

Maybe the overall folding of these microRNAs makes them (partially) resistant to the action of RNAses. BTW the article suggests that the rice microRNA is thermostable.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 21, 2011

This article gives clue and make us aware about what we eat can also have a impact on gene regulation and expression. The role of plant microRNA present in rice in controlling levels of LDL is noteworthy.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 21, 2011

Such a news could corroborate Pellionisz's Recursive Genome Function. Really, Simone Caramel and I have demonstrated, according to Manuel's story (http://www.sisbq.org/qbs-magaz..., that Pelliosnisz was right: Simone Caramel and Sergio
Stagnaro (2011) Quantum Chaotic Aspects of Biophysical Semeiotics -  from JOQBS 1   28-70, 2011, http://www.sisbq.org/uploads/5...

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 21, 2011

Diseases that have both an environmental and genetic component, such as autism, could be explained by this mechanism of foreign micro RNA. Very interesting to see if experiments find high levels of certain kinds of foreign regulatory RNA in such patients.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 21, 2011

Of course the food we eat influences many processes in our bodies, including gene expression - think of zinc needed in zinc-finger domain containing transcription factors. RNA from our food in that role is highly unlikely though. Every RNA handling researcher knows that it is already broken down 'by just looking at it'. RNases are everywhere. You would need tons of it for survival of a tiny bit in the tractus digestivus. The uptake (it is highly charged) would be almost impossible, and survival in the bloodstream even more unlikely than in the intestine. Uptake by individual cells is equally difficult. If genetic material from the gut could reach our cells that easily, we, no life, would have become extinct a very long time ago. In fact, it might never have started.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 21, 2011

Thank you Shi V. Liu for your comments. Right on. I might add that genetic crops and processed foods, herbicides, insecticides, etc. make for a very toxic soup all around. You will become what you eat - poisoned beyond DNA repair. This study is headed in the right direction.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 21, 2011

Natural crops are in fact already full of molecules which interact with our metabolism.
Adding a resistance gene which is encoding a protein only active against insects will not change this.
Anyway feeding 7 000 000 000 humans with organic crops is impossible.
And we'll be 10 000 000 000 soon...

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 21, 2011

That's a false statement -- the issue of feeding the world's population is an issue of logistics and finance - not of capacity. The globe produces enough calorific matter to feed twice the population we have today. The western world places a third of the food supply into landfill alone. Personally, I welcome GMOs as a valid and pertinent technology. I think it is often misused to create profit centric crops rather than solve actual food issues, but that is a fault of failed regulators and governments who do not support research in the academics and public domain. The point being this: do not believe that any one thing - in this case GMO - will be a magic bullet for any problem and do challenge the accepted status quo to demand better.

Returning to your original statement though, we are far better served by the development of faster and cheaper transport than the GM modified crops in solving world population feeding.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 21, 2011

Of course the food we eat influences many processes in our bodies, including gene expression - think of zinc needed in zinc-finger domain containing transcription factors. RNA from our food in that role is highly unlikely though. Every RNA handling researcher knows that it is already broken down 'by just looking at it'. RNases are everywhere. You would need tons of it for survival of a tiny bit in the tractus digestivus. The uptake (it is highly charged) would be almost impossible, and survival in the bloodstream even more unlikely than in the intestine. Uptake by individual cells is equally difficult. If genetic material from the gut could reach our cells that easily, we, no life, would have become extinct a very long time ago. In fact, it might never have started.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 21, 2011

Thank you Shi V. Liu for your comments. Right on. I might add that genetic crops and processed foods, herbicides, insecticides, etc. make for a very toxic soup all around. You will become what you eat - poisoned beyond DNA repair. This study is headed in the right direction.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 21, 2011

Maybe the overall folding of these microRNAs makes them (partially) resistant to the action of RNAses. BTW the article suggests that the rice microRNA is thermostable.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 21, 2011

This article gives clue and make us aware about what we eat can also have a impact on gene regulation and expression. The role of plant microRNA present in rice in controlling levels of LDL is noteworthy.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 21, 2011

Such a news could corroborate Pellionisz's Recursive Genome Function. Really, Simone Caramel and I have demonstrated, according to Manuel's story (http://www.sisbq.org/qbs-magaz..., that Pelliosnisz was right: Simone Caramel and Sergio
Stagnaro (2011) Quantum Chaotic Aspects of Biophysical Semeiotics -  from JOQBS 1   28-70, 2011, http://www.sisbq.org/uploads/5...

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 21, 2011

Diseases that have both an environmental and genetic component, such as autism, could be explained by this mechanism of foreign micro RNA. Very interesting to see if experiments find high levels of certain kinds of foreign regulatory RNA in such patients.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 21, 2011

Natural crops are in fact already full of molecules which interact with our metabolism.
Adding a resistance gene which is encoding a protein only active against insects will not change this.
Anyway feeding 7 000 000 000 humans with organic crops is impossible.
And we'll be 10 000 000 000 soon...

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 21, 2011

That's a false statement -- the issue of feeding the world's population is an issue of logistics and finance - not of capacity. The globe produces enough calorific matter to feed twice the population we have today. The western world places a third of the food supply into landfill alone. Personally, I welcome GMOs as a valid and pertinent technology. I think it is often misused to create profit centric crops rather than solve actual food issues, but that is a fault of failed regulators and governments who do not support research in the academics and public domain. The point being this: do not believe that any one thing - in this case GMO - will be a magic bullet for any problem and do challenge the accepted status quo to demand better.

Returning to your original statement though, we are far better served by the development of faster and cheaper transport than the GM modified crops in solving world population feeding.

Avatar of: daruma doll

daruma doll

Posts: 2

September 21, 2011

Maybe the overall folding of these microRNAs makes them (partially) resistant to the action of RNAses. BTW the article suggests that the rice microRNA is thermostable.

Avatar of: Dr. ichha Purak

Anonymous

September 21, 2011

This article gives clue and make us aware about what we eat can also have a impact on gene regulation and expression. The role of plant microRNA present in rice in controlling levels of LDL is noteworthy.

Avatar of: Sergio Stagnaro

Anonymous

September 21, 2011

Such a news could corroborate Pellionisz's Recursive Genome Function. Really, Simone Caramel and I have demonstrated, according to Manuel's story (http://www.sisbq.org/qbs-magaz..., that Pelliosnisz was right: Simone Caramel and Sergio
Stagnaro (2011) Quantum Chaotic Aspects of Biophysical Semeiotics -  from JOQBS 1   28-70, 2011, http://www.sisbq.org/uploads/5...

Avatar of: Damian

Anonymous

September 21, 2011

Diseases that have both an environmental and genetic component, such as autism, could be explained by this mechanism of foreign micro RNA. Very interesting to see if experiments find high levels of certain kinds of foreign regulatory RNA in such patients.

Avatar of: Paulaswell

Paulaswell

Posts: 1

September 21, 2011

Of course the food we eat influences many processes in our bodies, including gene expression - think of zinc needed in zinc-finger domain containing transcription factors. RNA from our food in that role is highly unlikely though. Every RNA handling researcher knows that it is already broken down 'by just looking at it'. RNases are everywhere. You would need tons of it for survival of a tiny bit in the tractus digestivus. The uptake (it is highly charged) would be almost impossible, and survival in the bloodstream even more unlikely than in the intestine. Uptake by individual cells is equally difficult. If genetic material from the gut could reach our cells that easily, we, no life, would have become extinct a very long time ago. In fact, it might never have started.

Avatar of: Sophie

Anonymous

September 21, 2011

Thank you Shi V. Liu for your comments. Right on. I might add that genetic crops and processed foods, herbicides, insecticides, etc. make for a very toxic soup all around. You will become what you eat - poisoned beyond DNA repair. This study is headed in the right direction.

Avatar of: daruma doll

daruma doll

Posts: 2

September 21, 2011

Natural crops are in fact already full of molecules which interact with our metabolism.
Adding a resistance gene which is encoding a protein only active against insects will not change this.
Anyway feeding 7 000 000 000 humans with organic crops is impossible.
And we'll be 10 000 000 000 soon...

Avatar of: xntrek

Anonymous

September 21, 2011

That's a false statement -- the issue of feeding the world's population is an issue of logistics and finance - not of capacity. The globe produces enough calorific matter to feed twice the population we have today. The western world places a third of the food supply into landfill alone. Personally, I welcome GMOs as a valid and pertinent technology. I think it is often misused to create profit centric crops rather than solve actual food issues, but that is a fault of failed regulators and governments who do not support research in the academics and public domain. The point being this: do not believe that any one thing - in this case GMO - will be a magic bullet for any problem and do challenge the accepted status quo to demand better.

Returning to your original statement though, we are far better served by the development of faster and cheaper transport than the GM modified crops in solving world population feeding.

Avatar of: Marshall

Anonymous

September 22, 2011

A ridiculous extrapolation from very preliminary findings.  Some will use any excuse to malign transgenic technology.

Avatar of: Relble2

Anonymous

September 22, 2011

Agreed. During my life, most things this flabbergasting have turned out to be wrong. Let's see it tested in some lab that does not have miR168 contaminating every surface.
If true, it's a game changer for many areas of science and medicine, so I hope it is true. But it seems too dramatically inconsistent with the nature of RNA, 3' methyl or not.
Put it to the test.

Avatar of: Mileau Ash

Mileau Ash

Posts: 1457

September 22, 2011

"Discover how what we eat can extend our age"... can extrapolate to if we don't eat food, we die.  So the longer we eat, the longer we live.  I'd like to get that research grant.  The work of limiting caloric intake and replacing functional calories with non-nutritive calories is currently widespread in the USA, with millions of participants in the study...

Avatar of: shroomer

shroomer

Posts: 1457

September 22, 2011

Maybe I am missing the Main point of this article BUT, We (humans) share 40%of our D N A with Bananas.The  research associating  the rice gene is negligible compared to what we already KNOW! of ,naturally grown, rice's many positive benefits . P S daruma doll is a Monsanto Hugging Suit  exposed by   Tree Hugger xntrek.  thanks  man!!

Avatar of: shroomer

shroomer

Posts: 1457

September 22, 2011

Do you work 4 Monsanto ?

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 22, 2011

A ridiculous extrapolation from very preliminary findings.  Some will use any excuse to malign transgenic technology.

Avatar of: Sergio Stagnaro

Anonymous

September 22, 2011

This fascinating news corroborates Pellionisz's Recursive Genome Function, as earlier demonstrated, from the clinical view-point, by well-known Manuel's Story, the first newborn without predisposition to cancer although its mother was positive before therapy.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 22, 2011

Do you work 4 Monsanto ?

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 22, 2011

Agreed. During my life, most things this flabbergasting have turned out to be wrong. Let's see it tested in some lab that does not have miR168 contaminating every surface.
If true, it's a game changer for many areas of science and medicine, so I hope it is true. But it seems too dramatically inconsistent with the nature of RNA, 3' methyl or not.
Put it to the test.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 22, 2011

"Discover how what we eat can extend our age"... can extrapolate to if we don't eat food, we die.  So the longer we eat, the longer we live.  I'd like to get that research grant.  The work of limiting caloric intake and replacing functional calories with non-nutritive calories is currently widespread in the USA, with millions of participants in the study...

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 22, 2011

Maybe I am missing the Main point of this article BUT, We (humans) share 40%of our D N A with Bananas.The  research associating  the rice gene is negligible compared to what we already KNOW! of ,naturally grown, rice's many positive benefits . P S daruma doll is a Monsanto Hugging Suit  exposed by   Tree Hugger xntrek.  thanks  man!!

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 22, 2011

This fascinating news corroborates Pellionisz's Recursive Genome Function, as earlier demonstrated, from the clinical view-point, by well-known Manuel's Story, the first newborn without predisposition to cancer although its mother was positive before therapy.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 22, 2011

A ridiculous extrapolation from very preliminary findings.  Some will use any excuse to malign transgenic technology.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 22, 2011

Agreed. During my life, most things this flabbergasting have turned out to be wrong. Let's see it tested in some lab that does not have miR168 contaminating every surface.
If true, it's a game changer for many areas of science and medicine, so I hope it is true. But it seems too dramatically inconsistent with the nature of RNA, 3' methyl or not.
Put it to the test.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 22, 2011

"Discover how what we eat can extend our age"... can extrapolate to if we don't eat food, we die.  So the longer we eat, the longer we live.  I'd like to get that research grant.  The work of limiting caloric intake and replacing functional calories with non-nutritive calories is currently widespread in the USA, with millions of participants in the study...

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 22, 2011

Maybe I am missing the Main point of this article BUT, We (humans) share 40%of our D N A with Bananas.The  research associating  the rice gene is negligible compared to what we already KNOW! of ,naturally grown, rice's many positive benefits . P S daruma doll is a Monsanto Hugging Suit  exposed by   Tree Hugger xntrek.  thanks  man!!

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 22, 2011

Do you work 4 Monsanto ?

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 22, 2011

This fascinating news corroborates Pellionisz's Recursive Genome Function, as earlier demonstrated, from the clinical view-point, by well-known Manuel's Story, the first newborn without predisposition to cancer although its mother was positive before therapy.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

September 25, 2011

And now the pseudoscientists have weighed in.  Sorry, but "Manuel's story" is not well-known to anyone but you.

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