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Misconduct in Chemistry

A graduate student fabricated several steps in the organic synthesis of a molecule.

By | October 20, 2011

A former chemistry graduate student at the University of Pittsburgh fabricated data that reported the successful synthesis of a molecule with known antibiotic and antitumor properties, according to a report by the Office of Research Integrity (ORI) published yesterday (October 20).

The federal investigation found that Marija Manojlovic fabricated and falsified nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data that confirmed the final structure, as well as several intermediate forms during the synthesis of pleurotin—a molecule first isolated from a fungal species in the 1940s. The data was used in a poster presentation and in a manuscript to be submitted to the renowned chemistry journal Angewandte Chemie International Edition.

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Avatar of: Victor Calvo

Victor Calvo

Posts: 4

October 20, 2011

We should congratulate Pittsburgh University for searching and pursuing this kind of conduct. But how may results in biological chemistry got inadvertently published after being contaminated over a long weekend standing on a bench. Not surprisingly there are so many opposing results published in N.E. J. of Med. However in chemistry these spectacular results are rarely due to unattended experiments but to the "pressure to publish spectacular out-comings" rather than "systematic painstaking" research. Shouldn't the editors (Angew. Chem. Intl. Ed.) make place for both kind of results.
VCalvoP

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

October 20, 2011

We should congratulate Pittsburgh University for searching and pursuing this kind of conduct. But how may results in biological chemistry got inadvertently published after being contaminated over a long weekend standing on a bench. Not surprisingly there are so many opposing results published in N.E. J. of Med. However in chemistry these spectacular results are rarely due to unattended experiments but to the "pressure to publish spectacular out-comings" rather than "systematic painstaking" research. Shouldn't the editors (Angew. Chem. Intl. Ed.) make place for both kind of results.
VCalvoP

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

October 20, 2011

We should congratulate Pittsburgh University for searching and pursuing this kind of conduct. But how may results in biological chemistry got inadvertently published after being contaminated over a long weekend standing on a bench. Not surprisingly there are so many opposing results published in N.E. J. of Med. However in chemistry these spectacular results are rarely due to unattended experiments but to the "pressure to publish spectacular out-comings" rather than "systematic painstaking" research. Shouldn't the editors (Angew. Chem. Intl. Ed.) make place for both kind of results.
VCalvoP

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