Rhino Goes Extinct in Vietnam

The last rhinoceros left in Vietnam was found killed, its horn sawed off, most likely by poachers.

By | October 26, 2011

WIKIMEDIA COMMONS, THOMAS HORSFIELD, RHINO RESOURCE CENTER

Although conservationists haven't recorded a sighting of a Javan Rhino in Vietnam since 2008, the droppings collected between 2009-2010 confirmed that there was only one animal left. In April 2010, researchers found the rhino's body. It was already beginning to decompose, and its horn had been sawed off, suggesting it was most likely killed by poachers.

The International Union for Conservation of Nature reported that rhino populations were under increasing pressure from poachers this year, due to demands from Asian markets, according to BBC News. Only 50 of these rhinos or fewer are thought to remain in the wild.

“It is painful that despite significant investment in the Vietnamese rhino population, conservation efforts failed to save this unique animal," Tran Thi Minh Hien, World Wildlife Federation-Vietnam country director, said in a prepared statement. "Vietnam has lost part of its natural heritage.”

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Comments

Avatar of: GEN

GEN

Posts: 1457

October 29, 2011

This is so incredibly sad. A case to be made for cloning extinct species???

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

October 29, 2011

This is so incredibly sad. A case to be made for cloning extinct species???

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

October 29, 2011

This is so incredibly sad. A case to be made for cloning extinct species???

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

November 2, 2011

Interesting that wildlife biologists couldn't find this animal for two years, but the poachers could.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

November 2, 2011

Interesting that wildlife biologists couldn't find this animal for two years, but the poachers could.

Avatar of: mightythor

mightythor

Posts: 1457

November 2, 2011

Interesting that wildlife biologists couldn't find this animal for two years, but the poachers could.

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