Super Sensitive Spider Sensilla

Researchers measure the responsiveness of a spider’s slit sensilla, sensory organs embedded in the exoskeleton that sense vibrations.

By | October 28, 2011

Brazilian wandering spiderWIKIMEDIA COMMONS, TECHUSER

You can’t tiptoe past a spider this Halloween. It will detect even the tiniest vibrations, according to a new study published in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface.

An adult female Cupiennius salei, the Central American wandering spider, has more than 3,000 slit sensilla, or strain sensors, on its body. Located mostly on the legs and near the leg joints, the sensors can detect vibrations in the surrounding substrate, helping them to catch prey even in the dark of night.

The sensilla are comprised of minute parallel slits. Nearby vibrations result in physical forces that compress and stimulate the sensors. Clemens F. Schaber of the University of Vienna and his colleagues used powerful optical and micro-force measurements and found that the sensory organs responded to forces as small as 0.01 milliNewtons—less than half a percent of the body weight of a typical cockroach.

Add a Comment

Avatar of: You

You

Processing...
Processing...

Sign In with your LabX Media Group Passport to leave a comment

Not a member? Register Now!

LabX Media Group Passport Logo

Popular Now

  1. Scientists Activate Predatory Instinct in Mice
  2. Superbug Resistant to Every Antibiotic in the U.S. Killed Nevada Woman
  3. Next Generation: Mobile Microscope Detects DNA Sequences
  4. Tenure Under Attack in Two More States
    The Nutshell Tenure Under Attack in Two More States

    Proposed legislation would eliminate academic tenure at public universities in Iowa and Missouri, echoing a move that has already gutted such permanent posts in Wisconsin.

RayBiotech