Double Flu Infections Pose Risk

The bird flu virus infected several people who were also sick with seasonal flu, risking a genetic mixing of the two that could result in a greater threat.

By | November 4, 2011

H1N1 virus particlesCDC / CYNTHIA GOLDSMITH

Recent surveillance has shown that several people in Cambodia were co-infected with avian influenza and the circulating flu virus, risking a re-combination event that could generate a greater viral threat.

“Influenza viruses are continually changing,” Patrick Blair, director of respiratory diseases at the US Naval Health Research Center in San Diego, said in a press release. Each flu virus contains genetic material that gives it particular properties. Researchers worry that the H5N1 strain, commonly called avian influenza, which hasn't been spreading well between humans, will obtain genetic material from seasonal flu that will allow it to jump between humans with ease. With a mortality rate of about 60 percent, a faster rate of spread could make avian flu a major risk.

However, in this case, the infected individuals recovered and the two strains tested did not show evidence of recombination. But the identification of such individuals demonstrates that the risk exists.  “Even though there may be a very small chance of this occurring, avian flu is still percolating in Southeast Asia and it continues to exhibit an extraordinarily high fatality rate in humans,” said Blair.

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Comments

Avatar of: edo_mcgowan

edo_mcgowan

Posts: 19

November 4, 2011

Interestingly, many of these flu viral bodies pass through the human elimination systems and are sent through the local sewer system which are not well designed to effectively deal with their destruction. Thus the semi-treated sewer effluents are released to major lakes and rivers and do carry impressive levels of pathogens into our sources of drinking water. The standard lab tests used to pass on the safety of our water supply are antiquated and thus can not "see" these pathogens, hence there is a false sense of security. The US-EPA is well aware of these faults but ignores them. Although the US-EPA did a major study documenting this failure some 30 years ago, it also then realized that the results would adversely impact its clients, the wastewater and drinking industries as well as the promotion of sewage sludge (biosolids) as a benign material, a material which is liberally spread across this nation's farmlands. Additionally, most people do not realize that sewer plants by their vary design are major aerosol generators and thus can spread pathogens to surrounding down-wind areas. When we will be hit with a major airborne pandemic is an open question and the sewer plants and their byproducts in such cases need to be viewed with severe caution. As it stands now, there is no preparation for this and thus Homeland Security, CDC, and the US-EPA have dropped the ball.

Dr Edo McGowan, Medical Geo-hydrology

Avatar of: jimbynum1

jimbynum1

Posts: 1

November 4, 2011

Since we know viruses are used to insert genetic material into bacteria, how long might it be until we have a bacteria that contains the avian flu genes? What happens when these pass through sewage treatment plants to your food and water or your lawn in an unlabeled soil amendment?

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

November 4, 2011

Interestingly, many of these flu viral bodies pass through the human elimination systems and are sent through the local sewer system which are not well designed to effectively deal with their destruction. Thus the semi-treated sewer effluents are released to major lakes and rivers and do carry impressive levels of pathogens into our sources of drinking water. The standard lab tests used to pass on the safety of our water supply are antiquated and thus can not "see" these pathogens, hence there is a false sense of security. The US-EPA is well aware of these faults but ignores them. Although the US-EPA did a major study documenting this failure some 30 years ago, it also then realized that the results would adversely impact its clients, the wastewater and drinking industries as well as the promotion of sewage sludge (biosolids) as a benign material, a material which is liberally spread across this nation's farmlands. Additionally, most people do not realize that sewer plants by their vary design are major aerosol generators and thus can spread pathogens to surrounding down-wind areas. When we will be hit with a major airborne pandemic is an open question and the sewer plants and their byproducts in such cases need to be viewed with severe caution. As it stands now, there is no preparation for this and thus Homeland Security, CDC, and the US-EPA have dropped the ball.

Dr Edo McGowan, Medical Geo-hydrology

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

November 4, 2011

Since we know viruses are used to insert genetic material into bacteria, how long might it be until we have a bacteria that contains the avian flu genes? What happens when these pass through sewage treatment plants to your food and water or your lawn in an unlabeled soil amendment?

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

November 4, 2011

Interestingly, many of these flu viral bodies pass through the human elimination systems and are sent through the local sewer system which are not well designed to effectively deal with their destruction. Thus the semi-treated sewer effluents are released to major lakes and rivers and do carry impressive levels of pathogens into our sources of drinking water. The standard lab tests used to pass on the safety of our water supply are antiquated and thus can not "see" these pathogens, hence there is a false sense of security. The US-EPA is well aware of these faults but ignores them. Although the US-EPA did a major study documenting this failure some 30 years ago, it also then realized that the results would adversely impact its clients, the wastewater and drinking industries as well as the promotion of sewage sludge (biosolids) as a benign material, a material which is liberally spread across this nation's farmlands. Additionally, most people do not realize that sewer plants by their vary design are major aerosol generators and thus can spread pathogens to surrounding down-wind areas. When we will be hit with a major airborne pandemic is an open question and the sewer plants and their byproducts in such cases need to be viewed with severe caution. As it stands now, there is no preparation for this and thus Homeland Security, CDC, and the US-EPA have dropped the ball.

Dr Edo McGowan, Medical Geo-hydrology

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

November 4, 2011

Since we know viruses are used to insert genetic material into bacteria, how long might it be until we have a bacteria that contains the avian flu genes? What happens when these pass through sewage treatment plants to your food and water or your lawn in an unlabeled soil amendment?

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

November 5, 2011

More dangerous.http://www.1stbearing.com

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

November 5, 2011

More dangerous.http://www.1stbearing.com

Avatar of: liar fan

liar fan

Posts: 1

November 5, 2011

More dangerous.http://www.1stbearing.com

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