Advertisement
TwistDx
TwistDx

Monikers Coined for No-Name Elements

Elements 110, 111, and 112 on the periodic table are officially named.

By | November 8, 2011

WIKIMEDIA COMMONS, SCIENCEDISCOVERER

Welcome darmstadtium (Ds), roentgenium (Rg) and copernicium (Cn), formerly known as Elements 110, 111 and 112, respectively. The names were suggested by the Joint Working Party on the Discovery of Elements, and approved last Friday (November 4) by the General Assembly of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC), according to the Institute of Physics (IOP) in London.

Thethree elements are synthetic substances first manufactured in the 1990s, according to The Chronicle of Higher Education. Darmstadtium was named after the city near where it was discovery, Darmstadt, Germany. The names roentgenium and copernicium were chosen to honor famed scientists of eras past—German physicist Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen, who discovered X-rays in 1895 and took home the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1901 for his work, and Nicolaus Copernicus, the famed Polish astronomer who theorized that the sun, not the earth, was the center of the solar system.

“The naming of these elements has been agreed in consultation with physicists around the world and we’re delighted to see them now being introduced to the Periodic Table,” Robert Kirby-Harris, Chief Executive at IOP and Secretary-General of IUPAP, said on the Institute's News page.

 

Advertisement

Add a Comment

Avatar of: You

You

Processing...
Processing...

Sign In with your LabX Media Group Passport to leave a comment

Not a member? Register Now!

LabX Media Group Passport Logo
Advertisement

Popular Now

  1. Staying Active in the Lab
    Careers Staying Active in the Lab

    Retiring as a professor, and even shutting down your own lab, doesn’t necessarily mean quitting research.

  2. When Does a Smart Mouse Become Human?
  3. The Lies That Scars Tell
    Notebook The Lies That Scars Tell

    Macaque trainers in Bangladesh are often bitten by their monkeys, but rarely infected by a particular simian retrovirus.

  4. Antibiotic Resistance Can Boost Bacterial Fitness
Advertisement
NeuroScientistNews
NeuroScientistNews
Advertisement
The Scientist