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University Settles With Professor

The University of Oklahoma settles a case against a professor accused of harming students in his research.

By | November 29, 2011

University of Oklahoma StadiumWIKIMEDIA COMMONS, NMAJDAN

A professor agreed to settle with his employer, the University of Oklahoma, over charges that he harmed students during research that did not follow standard protocol for work with humans.

Chad Kerksick, a professor of exercise science, was awarded a one-time payment of $75,000 and put on unpaid leave from his job on September 2.  Kerksick admitted to using students in his research on creatine nitrate, a body-building supplement, without following procedures intended to protect the rights of human trial participants. However, Kerksick challenged the University’s decision to terminate his position, calling it a “violation of state and federal laws,” according to The Oklahoma Daily.

According to legal papers obtained by the newspaper, Kerksick will remain on unpaid leave until the he finds another job, but neither he nor the university will pursue further legal action or make any negative public comments about each other, as part of the settlement agreement.

(Hat tip to The Chronicle of Higher Education)

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Comments

Avatar of: Scott Treece

Scott Treece

Posts: 1457

November 30, 2011

Creatine, not even once.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

November 30, 2011

Creatine, not even once.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

November 30, 2011

Creatine, not even once.

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