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$400M for Personalized Medicine

The National Institutes of Health promises about $400 million to help get personalized genetics into the clinic.

By | December 8, 2011

FLICKR, MJ/TR

The National Human Genome Research Institute announced that it is sending approximately $300 million to three institutes to continue work on the 1000 Genomes Project, which aims to catalogue DNA variation in people, and the Cancer Genome Atlas,  which is investigates the genetic changes that characterize cancers, according to ScienceInsider.

An additional $100 million will go to several new projects that will help translate some of this genomic information into the clinic. For example, $20 million will go towards the development of software for processing large sets of genomic data into medically relevant information—a capability that few currently have, outside of large sequencing centers, reported Nature.  Another chunk of the funds will go towards the study of rare single-mutation heritable disease that shed light on basic human physiology.

Another $40 million will go toward finding an interdisciplinary answer to the question of how and when it’s appropriate to incorporate this genomic data into clinical practice once we have it.

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Avatar of: jhnycmltly

jhnycmltly

Posts: 65

December 8, 2011

One might wonder , since genes are reversible , wouldn't it be better to target EVERYONE with the SAME treatment , as opposed to "personalizing genetics" ? I know personalizing will open up a large practice for those IN genetics BUT the cost of personalizing genetics as opposed to the same treatment for everyone is an obstacle TO treatment. In countries where there is very limited money for medicine or research the individual treatment cannot be afforded BUT the 'shotgun' treatment can.
"Jack Neighbour became one of the first British children to receive the treatment, which uses an old-fashioned drug to switch off a serious genetic defect"
"Gene Expression Modulation by Small-molecules (GEMS) "

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

December 8, 2011

One might wonder , since genes are reversible , wouldn't it be better to target EVERYONE with the SAME treatment , as opposed to "personalizing genetics" ? I know personalizing will open up a large practice for those IN genetics BUT the cost of personalizing genetics as opposed to the same treatment for everyone is an obstacle TO treatment. In countries where there is very limited money for medicine or research the individual treatment cannot be afforded BUT the 'shotgun' treatment can.
"Jack Neighbour became one of the first British children to receive the treatment, which uses an old-fashioned drug to switch off a serious genetic defect"
"Gene Expression Modulation by Small-molecules (GEMS) "

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

December 8, 2011

One might wonder , since genes are reversible , wouldn't it be better to target EVERYONE with the SAME treatment , as opposed to "personalizing genetics" ? I know personalizing will open up a large practice for those IN genetics BUT the cost of personalizing genetics as opposed to the same treatment for everyone is an obstacle TO treatment. In countries where there is very limited money for medicine or research the individual treatment cannot be afforded BUT the 'shotgun' treatment can.
"Jack Neighbour became one of the first British children to receive the treatment, which uses an old-fashioned drug to switch off a serious genetic defect"
"Gene Expression Modulation by Small-molecules (GEMS) "

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