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Universities Roll-back Pharma’s Fees

Research universities are removing the licensing fees they charged industry companies for working with their scientists.

By | December 20, 2011

FLICKR, DAVEYNIN

A number of universities across the country have decided to do away with licensing fees it charged industry companies, citing the fact that the deals don’t provide much payoff to the schools. Both Pennsylvania State University and the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities are withdrawing the requirement, in the hopes that it will attract more industry funding, which it deems more beneficial to the faculty and students.

The decision is also expected to greatly simplify intellectual property policies, which are often extremely time and resource consuming for universities.  To date, many universities have written up agreements for any innovations produced by industry collaborations in the hope that one would become a blockbuster.  Most, however, went nowhere, making it increasingly difficult to justify the expense.  With the new change, the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities will only negotiate licenses on innovations deemed highly probable to succeed by the company, reported The Chronicle of Higher Education.  The risk, higher-education leadership professor Joshua Powers told The Chronicle, is that companies might retain exclusive rights, which would limit how the discoveries are shared among scientists.

With more than $100 million in research dollars coming from industry, Pennsylvania State University is already ranked fourth among US universities in terms of how much of its research money is derived from pharma. Officials expect that number to increase as the new rule attracts new partnerships with companies who had previously shied away because of the onerous licensing agreements.

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Comments

Avatar of: Lah99

Lah99

Posts: 6

December 20, 2011

This would be particularly valuable for early stage and start up companies who are often strapped with costs that increase risk of failure for everyone involved.

Avatar of: Rich Patrock

Rich Patrock

Posts: 1457

December 20, 2011

I hope this move doesn't lead to an even stronger stranglehold on research by Pharma.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

December 20, 2011

This would be particularly valuable for early stage and start up companies who are often strapped with costs that increase risk of failure for everyone involved.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

December 20, 2011

I hope this move doesn't lead to an even stronger stranglehold on research by Pharma.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

December 20, 2011

This would be particularly valuable for early stage and start up companies who are often strapped with costs that increase risk of failure for everyone involved.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

December 20, 2011

I hope this move doesn't lead to an even stronger stranglehold on research by Pharma.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

December 22, 2011

As an academic licensing professional, I am not sure what this overly generalized story is saying.  Academic institutions' technology transfer first goal is to get the products of academic research on the market to benefit people in need. To accomplish this, licensing deals made by institutions are creatively structured to match the stage of each company. These deals increasingly may include sponsored research projects, as large pharma companies seek to shift pipeline development to groups outside of their walls.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

December 22, 2011

As an academic licensing professional, I am not sure what this overly generalized story is saying.  Academic institutions' technology transfer first goal is to get the products of academic research on the market to benefit people in need. To accomplish this, licensing deals made by institutions are creatively structured to match the stage of each company. These deals increasingly may include sponsored research projects, as large pharma companies seek to shift pipeline development to groups outside of their walls.

Avatar of: Abbie_Meyer

Abbie_Meyer

Posts: 1

December 22, 2011

As an academic licensing professional, I am not sure what this overly generalized story is saying.  Academic institutions' technology transfer first goal is to get the products of academic research on the market to benefit people in need. To accomplish this, licensing deals made by institutions are creatively structured to match the stage of each company. These deals increasingly may include sponsored research projects, as large pharma companies seek to shift pipeline development to groups outside of their walls.

December 24, 2011

Further enmeshing of Pharma and universities. Pharma-led, ghost-written studies are now the norm, rendering true scientific inquiry a thing of the past in short order. Truly depressing.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

December 24, 2011

Further enmeshing of Pharma and universities. Pharma-led, ghost-written studies are now the norm, rendering true scientific inquiry a thing of the past in short order. Truly depressing.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

December 24, 2011

Further enmeshing of Pharma and universities. Pharma-led, ghost-written studies are now the norm, rendering true scientific inquiry a thing of the past in short order. Truly depressing.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

February 20, 2012

Oh now I see.  I really thought this was just about profits.  Thanks for clearing that up.  How cynical of me!

Avatar of: John Ginnetti

John Ginnetti

Posts: 1

February 20, 2012

Oh now I see.  I really thought this was just about profits.  Thanks for clearing that up.  How cynical of me!

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

February 20, 2012

Oh now I see.  I really thought this was just about profits.  Thanks for clearing that up.  How cynical of me!

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