Advertisement

Bat Hunt

Bucknell University mammalogist DeeAnn Reeder raises nets high into the darkened forest canopies of South Sudan to catch bats.

By | January 1, 2012

Reeder's husband Thomas, with their son and daughter. All three family members have contracted Malaria during their trips to South Sudan.Courtesy of DeeAnn Reeder

Reeder's husband Thomas, with their son and daughter. All three family members have contracted Malaria during their trips to South Sudan.Courtesy of DeeAnn Reeder

Bat Hunt Image Gallery

For the past four years, Bucknell University mammalogist DeeAnn Reeder has been raising nets high into the darkened forest canopies of South Sudan to catch bats. During her latest journey to the embattled country in 2011, and working with no electricity or running water and scant protection from the elements, Reeder and her team of graduate students and field technicians performed makeshift experiments in the field to probe the immune capabilities of the captured bats in the hopes of understanding why these mammals are such good reservoirs for deadly viruses such as Ebola and Marburg.

Read the full story.

[gallery columns="4"]

Advertisement

Add a Comment

Avatar of: You

You

Processing...
Processing...

Sign In with your LabX Media Group Passport to leave a comment

Not a member? Register Now!

LabX Media Group Passport Logo

Comments

Avatar of: Jamie Clements

Jamie Clements

Posts: 1

January 14, 2012

I find this article very intersesting. I will teach this to my students at Currys university. From Rajim Beta Patel.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

January 14, 2012

I find this article very intersesting. I will teach this to my students at Currys university. From Rajim Beta Patel.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

January 14, 2012

I find this article very intersesting. I will teach this to my students at Currys university. From Rajim Beta Patel.

Advertisement

Popular Now

  1. Lost Y Chromosome Genes Found on Autosomes
  2. Brain Drain
    Daily News Brain Drain

    The brain contains lymphatic vessels similar to those found elsewhere in the body, a mouse study shows.

  3. Next Generation: Souped-up Probiotics Pinpoint Cancer
  4. Genomes Point the Way
    Daily News Genomes Point the Way

    Sequence analysis of Egyptian, Ethiopian, and non-African peoples indicates a likely route taken by modern humans migrating out of Africa.

Advertisement
The Scientist
The Scientist