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Killer TB Hits India

An incurable form of tuberculosis has turned up on the subcontinent.

By | January 16, 2012

image: Killer TB Hits India An SEM of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteriaWikimedia Commons, CDC - Janice Carr

An SEM of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteriaWIKIMEDIA COMMONS, CDC - JANICE CARR

Just as India celebrated the one-year anniversary of what appears to be the last child to be infected with polio in that country, physicians there have reported the occurrence of a dreaded disease: a deadly form of tuberculosis that is completely resistant to any of the drugs typically used to treat it. They described patients with the incurable illness, called totally drug-resistant tuberculosis (TDR-TB), in the February issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases.

This new finding makes India the third country in which TDR-TB has appeared. Cases of the disease turned up in Italy in 2007 and in Iran in 2009, though some researchers claim that TDR-TB is just a more severe form of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB), which has been found in at least 58 countries across the globe.

A variety of factors could have led to the development of TDR-TB, including inadequate detection and diagnosis, improper treatment, and the lack of new first-line drugs to treat drug-resistant forms of TB. "The cases are a story of mismanagement," Giovanni Migliori, director of the World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centre for Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases in Tradate, Italy, told Nature. "Resistance is man-made, caused by exposure to the wrong treatment, the wrong regimen, the wrong treatment duration."

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Comments

Avatar of: jhnycmltly

jhnycmltly

Posts: 65

January 16, 2012

"the lack of new first line drugs to treat drug-resistant forms"

One might think of using a simple inexpensive iron reduction strategy?
It has been shown TB is an iron requiring bug.
"To multiply and cause disease in the host, Mycobacterium tuberculosis must acquire iron from the extracellular environment at sites of replication."

The use of hijama / bloodletting and a low-iron diet would be an inexpensive iron reduction treatment available to anyone ?
"Modern medical theories about bloodletting suggest that a drop in iron might help "starve" microbes and other germs"
"An excess of iron may enhance the growth of M. tuberculosis and worsen the outcome of human tuberculosis"
"The prevention and treatment of dietary iron overload could contribute to the control of tuberculosis in African populations"
It has also been shown Asians have high iron levels.
"Asians, Pacific Islanders Have Highest Blood Iron Levels"
 

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

January 16, 2012

"the lack of new first line drugs to treat drug-resistant forms"

One might think of using a simple inexpensive iron reduction strategy?
It has been shown TB is an iron requiring bug.
"To multiply and cause disease in the host, Mycobacterium tuberculosis must acquire iron from the extracellular environment at sites of replication."

The use of hijama / bloodletting and a low-iron diet would be an inexpensive iron reduction treatment available to anyone ?
"Modern medical theories about bloodletting suggest that a drop in iron might help "starve" microbes and other germs"
"An excess of iron may enhance the growth of M. tuberculosis and worsen the outcome of human tuberculosis"
"The prevention and treatment of dietary iron overload could contribute to the control of tuberculosis in African populations"
It has also been shown Asians have high iron levels.
"Asians, Pacific Islanders Have Highest Blood Iron Levels"
 

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

January 16, 2012

"the lack of new first line drugs to treat drug-resistant forms"

One might think of using a simple inexpensive iron reduction strategy?
It has been shown TB is an iron requiring bug.
"To multiply and cause disease in the host, Mycobacterium tuberculosis must acquire iron from the extracellular environment at sites of replication."

The use of hijama / bloodletting and a low-iron diet would be an inexpensive iron reduction treatment available to anyone ?
"Modern medical theories about bloodletting suggest that a drop in iron might help "starve" microbes and other germs"
"An excess of iron may enhance the growth of M. tuberculosis and worsen the outcome of human tuberculosis"
"The prevention and treatment of dietary iron overload could contribute to the control of tuberculosis in African populations"
It has also been shown Asians have high iron levels.
"Asians, Pacific Islanders Have Highest Blood Iron Levels"
 

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

January 17, 2012

This scenario is what Collaborative Drug Discovery was created to
address.

https://www.collaborativedrug....

 

Large Pharma has limited interest in this area of research but through
global collaboration small groups of researchers are working together to find
solutions.  The MM4TB consortium is
addressing this head-on using CDD as an engine for collaboration.

http://www.mm4tb.org/

 

Hopefully progress will come swiftly.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

January 17, 2012

This scenario is what Collaborative Drug Discovery was created to
address.

https://www.collaborativedrug....

 

Large Pharma has limited interest in this area of research but through
global collaboration small groups of researchers are working together to find
solutions.  The MM4TB consortium is
addressing this head-on using CDD as an engine for collaboration.

http://www.mm4tb.org/

 

Hopefully progress will come swiftly.

Avatar of: Bob Morrow

Bob Morrow

Posts: 1

January 17, 2012

This scenario is what Collaborative Drug Discovery was created to
address.

https://www.collaborativedrug....

 

Large Pharma has limited interest in this area of research but through
global collaboration small groups of researchers are working together to find
solutions.  The MM4TB consortium is
addressing this head-on using CDD as an engine for collaboration.

http://www.mm4tb.org/

 

Hopefully progress will come swiftly.

January 18, 2012

Re Incurrable TB in Inda:
The old sanatorium approach with lots of sunlight exposure to TB has now been shown to have had a sound biological rationale. Higher levels of vitamin D have been shown to boost the immune system's efficacy in fighting TB (among many other infections). Current research has shown that getting vitamin D levels up to 80-90 ng/ml has often had dramatic positive effects on the human body. However, there is a catch, Vit D2 (prescription vit D) does not stay in the body for long and in at least one study is associated with an increased rate of all cause death. Vit D3 although associated with a reduction in all cause death rates, uses a different metabolic process than Vit D produced by ultraviolet exposure and hence may be less effective than mid day sunlight exposure. Aside from the fact that you can't make money with vit D therapy, it seems a no brainer to conduct a study checking vit D blood levels of those with TB, then monitor the effects of using a safe UV source such as tanning beds with electronic ballasts (to prevent exposure to intense EMF fields from magnetic ballasts), to bring blood levels up to 90 ng/ml. This is an extremely conservative approach and would be inexpensive.I know all the money and power is in drugs, but some times you just have to step up and do the right thing. Explore protocols which offer an extraordinarily high safety profile, but still offer a significant possibility of positive outcomes.Organizations such as EvinceNaturals are already doing some similar work. Providing at no cost,  nutrient/enzyme protocols for open label studies in Asthma, Autism, Endometriosis, Fibromyalgia, Growing Pains, Interstitial Cystitis, Over Active Bladder, Restless Leg Syndrome and PTSD in military personnel or veterans.Health care costs are beggaring the world, while the burden of disease continues to grow. We need to explore the low hanging inexpensive fruit. It's not so much that we need to look outside the box, but rather that we need to be willing to peek into differing boxes. David GilbertEcoSys Holistic Wellness CenterOttawa, Ontario, Canada

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

January 18, 2012

Re Incurrable TB in Inda:
The old sanatorium approach with lots of sunlight exposure to TB has now been shown to have had a sound biological rationale. Higher levels of vitamin D have been shown to boost the immune system's efficacy in fighting TB (among many other infections). Current research has shown that getting vitamin D levels up to 80-90 ng/ml has often had dramatic positive effects on the human body. However, there is a catch, Vit D2 (prescription vit D) does not stay in the body for long and in at least one study is associated with an increased rate of all cause death. Vit D3 although associated with a reduction in all cause death rates, uses a different metabolic process than Vit D produced by ultraviolet exposure and hence may be less effective than mid day sunlight exposure. Aside from the fact that you can't make money with vit D therapy, it seems a no brainer to conduct a study checking vit D blood levels of those with TB, then monitor the effects of using a safe UV source such as tanning beds with electronic ballasts (to prevent exposure to intense EMF fields from magnetic ballasts), to bring blood levels up to 90 ng/ml. This is an extremely conservative approach and would be inexpensive.I know all the money and power is in drugs, but some times you just have to step up and do the right thing. Explore protocols which offer an extraordinarily high safety profile, but still offer a significant possibility of positive outcomes.Organizations such as EvinceNaturals are already doing some similar work. Providing at no cost,  nutrient/enzyme protocols for open label studies in Asthma, Autism, Endometriosis, Fibromyalgia, Growing Pains, Interstitial Cystitis, Over Active Bladder, Restless Leg Syndrome and PTSD in military personnel or veterans.Health care costs are beggaring the world, while the burden of disease continues to grow. We need to explore the low hanging inexpensive fruit. It's not so much that we need to look outside the box, but rather that we need to be willing to peek into differing boxes. David GilbertEcoSys Holistic Wellness CenterOttawa, Ontario, Canada

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

January 18, 2012

Re Incurrable TB in Inda:
The old sanatorium approach with lots of sunlight exposure to TB has now been shown to have had a sound biological rationale. Higher levels of vitamin D have been shown to boost the immune system's efficacy in fighting TB (among many other infections). Current research has shown that getting vitamin D levels up to 80-90 ng/ml has often had dramatic positive effects on the human body. However, there is a catch, Vit D2 (prescription vit D) does not stay in the body for long and in at least one study is associated with an increased rate of all cause death. Vit D3 although associated with a reduction in all cause death rates, uses a different metabolic process than Vit D produced by ultraviolet exposure and hence may be less effective than mid day sunlight exposure. Aside from the fact that you can't make money with vit D therapy, it seems a no brainer to conduct a study checking vit D blood levels of those with TB, then monitor the effects of using a safe UV source such as tanning beds with electronic ballasts (to prevent exposure to intense EMF fields from magnetic ballasts), to bring blood levels up to 90 ng/ml. This is an extremely conservative approach and would be inexpensive.I know all the money and power is in drugs, but some times you just have to step up and do the right thing. Explore protocols which offer an extraordinarily high safety profile, but still offer a significant possibility of positive outcomes.Organizations such as EvinceNaturals are already doing some similar work. Providing at no cost,  nutrient/enzyme protocols for open label studies in Asthma, Autism, Endometriosis, Fibromyalgia, Growing Pains, Interstitial Cystitis, Over Active Bladder, Restless Leg Syndrome and PTSD in military personnel or veterans.Health care costs are beggaring the world, while the burden of disease continues to grow. We need to explore the low hanging inexpensive fruit. It's not so much that we need to look outside the box, but rather that we need to be willing to peek into differing boxes. David GilbertEcoSys Holistic Wellness CenterOttawa, Ontario, Canada

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