Multicellular Yeast

Yeast selected to settle more quickly through a test tube evolved into multicellular, snowflake-like clusters in just 2 weeks, or about 100 generations. 

By | January 16, 2012

A yeast cluster with the cell walls stained with the blue dye calcofluor.

A yeast cluster with the cell walls stained with the blue dye calcofluor.

Multicellular Yeast Image Gallery

Yeast selected to settle more quickly through a test tube evolved into multicellular, snowflake-like clusters in just 2 weeks, or about 100 generations. The clusters evolved to be larger, produce multicellular progeny, and even show differentiation of the cells within the cluster—all key characteristics of multicellular organisms.

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