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The Benefits of Coffee

Researchers finally nail down why drinking coffee helps reduce the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.

By | January 17, 2012

WIKIMEDIA COMMONS, TAKKK

Researchers have known for some time that regular coffee drinkers have a lower risk of developing Type 2 diabetes: people who drink four or more cups of coffee each day have a 50 percent lower risk of the disease, with each additional cup associated with a further 7 percent drop in risk. But the cause of this bizarre connection has been a source of speculation.

Now, researchers in China have found evidence that coffee influences the misfolding of the human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a protein implicated in causing Type 2 diabetes. According to their paper published in the Journal of Agricultural & Food Chemistry, certain compounds in coffee significantly inhibited the formation of toxic hIAPP amyloids, which likely explains the lowered risk of Type 2 diabetes in coffee lovers.

“These findings suggest that the beneficial effects of coffee consumption on [Type 2 diabetes] may be partly due to the ability of the major coffee components and metabolites to inhibit the toxic aggregation of hIAPP,” the authors wrote. “A beneficial effect may thus be expected for a regular coffee drinker.”

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Comments

Avatar of: Robert Lanning

Robert Lanning

Posts: 1

January 17, 2012

i also wonder if the appetite suppression by caffeine helps prevent type 2 diabetes

Avatar of: Elizabeth Grimes

Elizabeth Grimes

Posts: 1457

January 17, 2012

Both of my parents are coffee drinkers and both have Type 2 diabetes. So I guess they are in the 50% that still get it. My mom drinks hers black with no sugar, and my dad drinks his black with splenda (he did use sugar prior to Splenda being introduced). I think this is another thing they are trying to link but it's not really the case. There are probably multiple factors that lead to a person not getting diabetes. I think it's another one of those things that is a per person specific body chemistry type of thing.... just like everything else. 

January 17, 2012

"I think this is another thing they are trying to link but it's not really the case."

The article says they found a definite chemical link.  Your anecdotal evidence kind of pales in comparison.  I can find two color blind people who think green paint is blue, but that doesn't negate the fact we know the subject contains the chemical makeup to produce a green appearance.

Avatar of: jhnycmltly

jhnycmltly

Posts: 65

January 17, 2012

Using Science to understand the cause for the effects , one could say the iron chelators in the coffee such as tannins and phytates would lower the risk of diabetes.
"Iron absorption is inhibited by plant phytates and tannins"
The NIH is conducting a clinical trial of iron depletion for type 2 diabetes.
"Iron Depletion Therapy for Type 2 DM and NAFLD "
Iron has also been implicated in amyloid production and therefore , logically , one might think lowering iron would lower amyloid pathology.
"Redox-active iron mediates amyloid-beta toxicity"

Avatar of: jhnycmltly

jhnycmltly

Posts: 65

January 17, 2012

"magnetite, a mixed-valence iron oxide, and local elevations in iron levels in tissue associated with amyloid-β-containing plaques"
"The presence of significant concentrations of Al(III) and Fe(III) as contaminants of 'Abeta42 only' preparations suggested that both of these metals were involved in either triggering the formation or stabilising the structure of beta-pleated amyloid. If the formation of such amyloid is critical to the aetiology of AD then the chelation of Al(III) and Fe(III) may prove to be a protective mechanism whilst the chelation of Cu(II) and Zn(II) without also chelating Al(III) and Fe(III) might actually exacerbate the condition."

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

January 17, 2012

I've always wondered if these studies take into account the fact that because they're drinking coffee, they're not drinking high-sugar drinks like soda or energy drinks.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

January 17, 2012

i also wonder if the appetite suppression by caffeine helps prevent type 2 diabetes

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

January 17, 2012

Both of my parents are coffee drinkers and both have Type 2 diabetes. So I guess they are in the 50% that still get it. My mom drinks hers black with no sugar, and my dad drinks his black with splenda (he did use sugar prior to Splenda being introduced). I think this is another thing they are trying to link but it's not really the case. There are probably multiple factors that lead to a person not getting diabetes. I think it's another one of those things that is a per person specific body chemistry type of thing.... just like everything else. 

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

January 17, 2012

"I think this is another thing they are trying to link but it's not really the case."

The article says they found a definite chemical link.  Your anecdotal evidence kind of pales in comparison.  I can find two color blind people who think green paint is blue, but that doesn't negate the fact we know the subject contains the chemical makeup to produce a green appearance.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

January 17, 2012

Using Science to understand the cause for the effects , one could say the iron chelators in the coffee such as tannins and phytates would lower the risk of diabetes.
"Iron absorption is inhibited by plant phytates and tannins"
The NIH is conducting a clinical trial of iron depletion for type 2 diabetes.
"Iron Depletion Therapy for Type 2 DM and NAFLD "
Iron has also been implicated in amyloid production and therefore , logically , one might think lowering iron would lower amyloid pathology.
"Redox-active iron mediates amyloid-beta toxicity"

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

January 17, 2012

"magnetite, a mixed-valence iron oxide, and local elevations in iron levels in tissue associated with amyloid-β-containing plaques"
"The presence of significant concentrations of Al(III) and Fe(III) as contaminants of 'Abeta42 only' preparations suggested that both of these metals were involved in either triggering the formation or stabilising the structure of beta-pleated amyloid. If the formation of such amyloid is critical to the aetiology of AD then the chelation of Al(III) and Fe(III) may prove to be a protective mechanism whilst the chelation of Cu(II) and Zn(II) without also chelating Al(III) and Fe(III) might actually exacerbate the condition."

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

January 17, 2012

I've always wondered if these studies take into account the fact that because they're drinking coffee, they're not drinking high-sugar drinks like soda or energy drinks.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

January 17, 2012

i also wonder if the appetite suppression by caffeine helps prevent type 2 diabetes

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

January 17, 2012

Both of my parents are coffee drinkers and both have Type 2 diabetes. So I guess they are in the 50% that still get it. My mom drinks hers black with no sugar, and my dad drinks his black with splenda (he did use sugar prior to Splenda being introduced). I think this is another thing they are trying to link but it's not really the case. There are probably multiple factors that lead to a person not getting diabetes. I think it's another one of those things that is a per person specific body chemistry type of thing.... just like everything else. 

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

January 17, 2012

"I think this is another thing they are trying to link but it's not really the case."

The article says they found a definite chemical link.  Your anecdotal evidence kind of pales in comparison.  I can find two color blind people who think green paint is blue, but that doesn't negate the fact we know the subject contains the chemical makeup to produce a green appearance.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

January 17, 2012

Using Science to understand the cause for the effects , one could say the iron chelators in the coffee such as tannins and phytates would lower the risk of diabetes.
"Iron absorption is inhibited by plant phytates and tannins"
The NIH is conducting a clinical trial of iron depletion for type 2 diabetes.
"Iron Depletion Therapy for Type 2 DM and NAFLD "
Iron has also been implicated in amyloid production and therefore , logically , one might think lowering iron would lower amyloid pathology.
"Redox-active iron mediates amyloid-beta toxicity"

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

January 17, 2012

"magnetite, a mixed-valence iron oxide, and local elevations in iron levels in tissue associated with amyloid-β-containing plaques"
"The presence of significant concentrations of Al(III) and Fe(III) as contaminants of 'Abeta42 only' preparations suggested that both of these metals were involved in either triggering the formation or stabilising the structure of beta-pleated amyloid. If the formation of such amyloid is critical to the aetiology of AD then the chelation of Al(III) and Fe(III) may prove to be a protective mechanism whilst the chelation of Cu(II) and Zn(II) without also chelating Al(III) and Fe(III) might actually exacerbate the condition."

Avatar of: Eric Johnson

Eric Johnson

Posts: 3

January 17, 2012

I've always wondered if these studies take into account the fact that because they're drinking coffee, they're not drinking high-sugar drinks like soda or energy drinks.

Avatar of: johndossantos

johndossantos

Posts: 8

January 19, 2012

Developing type 2 diabetes has little to do with sugar consumption, and more to do with generally poor eating habits (e.g. processed foods high in refined-carbs, although not necessarily high in sugar) and lack of adequate exercise.
It tends to be young people (teenagers) who go for the sugary drinks, as they seek sugar to help support their rapidly growing bodies.
Most people develop type 2 diabetes in middle age, at a point in life where they've most likely gotten past their sugar-seeking phase, but at the peak of their poor eating & poor exercise phase.

Avatar of: Eric Johnson

Eric Johnson

Posts: 3

January 19, 2012

It was my understanding that both refined carbs and sugar both have a similar effect on insulin secretion...is that not true?

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

January 19, 2012

Developing type 2 diabetes has little to do with sugar consumption, and more to do with generally poor eating habits (e.g. processed foods high in refined-carbs, although not necessarily high in sugar) and lack of adequate exercise.
It tends to be young people (teenagers) who go for the sugary drinks, as they seek sugar to help support their rapidly growing bodies.
Most people develop type 2 diabetes in middle age, at a point in life where they've most likely gotten past their sugar-seeking phase, but at the peak of their poor eating & poor exercise phase.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

January 19, 2012

It was my understanding that both refined carbs and sugar both have a similar effect on insulin secretion...is that not true?

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

January 19, 2012

Developing type 2 diabetes has little to do with sugar consumption, and more to do with generally poor eating habits (e.g. processed foods high in refined-carbs, although not necessarily high in sugar) and lack of adequate exercise.
It tends to be young people (teenagers) who go for the sugary drinks, as they seek sugar to help support their rapidly growing bodies.
Most people develop type 2 diabetes in middle age, at a point in life where they've most likely gotten past their sugar-seeking phase, but at the peak of their poor eating & poor exercise phase.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

January 19, 2012

It was my understanding that both refined carbs and sugar both have a similar effect on insulin secretion...is that not true?

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