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Cracks Form in Anti-Open Access Push

Academic and commercial publishers disagree on the legislation that would limit public access to federally funded research findings.

By | January 18, 2012

image: Cracks Form in Anti-Open Access Push Wikimedia Commons, Paul Stainthorp

WIKIMEDIA COMMONS, PAUL STAINTHORP

Academic publishers are publically disagreeing with their commercial counterparts over their association's support of a bill being considered in the US Congress that would limit open access to research findings funded with tax payer dollars.

It was not so surprising when last week the Association of American Publishers (AAP) came out in favor of the Research Works Act, which would roll back the National Institutes of Health Public Access Policy mandating that all published research funded by the federal science agency be submitted to the publically accessible digital archive PubMed Central. But since announcing its stance, the trade group, which includes in its ranks scientific journal publishers Elsevier, Sage, and other corporate members, has been seeing its non-profit members—university presses and the like—voice their disagreement.

The MIT Press was the first to contravene the association's position on the legislation. "The AAP's press release on the Research Works Act does not reflect the position of the MIT Press," the press's director Ellen Faran wrote in an email making the rounds in open-access circles last week. "We will not, however, withdraw from the AAP on this issue as we value the association's work over all and the opportunity to participate as a member of the larger and diverse publishing community." She added her suspicion that other academic presses felt the same way about the Research Works Act, and it turns out she was right.

The Rockefeller University Press, the University of California Press, and the Pennsylvania State University Press all followed the MIT Press's lead, releasing their own statements rejecting the association's stance. Throughout last week, open-access advocate Richard Poynder followed the splits on his blog Open and Shut.

This week, Faran told The Chronicle of Higher Education that the MIT Press allows its authors to share pre- and post- publication versions of studies they publish in the press's scholarly journals, behavior that would be made illegal by the Research Works Act. The legislation, Faran told The Chronicle, "is not congruent with our other open-access policies."

The bill is currently in the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, and if history is any guide, it faces a tough climb in Congress. Earlier versions of the legislation have all failed.

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January 18, 2012

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David Gilbert
EcoSys Holistic Wellness Center
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

January 18, 2012

The old sanatorium approach with lots of sunlight exposure to TB has now been shown to have had a sound biological rationale. Higher levels of vitamin D have been shown to boost the immune system's efficacy in fighting TB (among many other infections). Current research has shown that getting vitamin D levels up to 80-90 ng/ml has often had dramatic positive effects on the human body. However, there is a catch, Vit D2 (prescription vit D) does not stay in the body for long and in at least one study is associated with an increased rate of all cause death. Vit D3 although associated with a reduction in all cause death rates, uses a different metabolic process than Vit D produced by ultraviolet exposure and hence may be less effective than mid day sunlight exposure.

Aside from the fact that you can't make money with vit D therapy, it seems a no brainer to conduct a study checking vit D blood levels of those with TB, then monitor the effects of using a safe UV source such as tanning beds with electronic ballasts (to prevent exposure to intense EMF fields from magnetic ballasts), to bring blood levels up to 90 ng/ml. This is an extremely conservative approach and would be inexpensive.

I know all the money and power is in drugs, but some times you just have to step up and do the right thing. Explore protocols which offer an extraordinarily high safety profile, but still offer a significant possibility of positive outcomes.

Organizations such as EvinceNaturals are already doing some similar work. Providing at no cost,  nutrient/enzyme protocols for open label studies in Asthma, Autism, Endometriosis, Fibromyalgia, Growing Pains, Interstitial Cystitis, Over Active Bladder, Restless Leg Syndrome and PTSD in military personnel or veterans.

Health care costs are beggaring the world, while the burden of disease continues to grow. We need to explore the low hanging inexpensive fruit. It's not so much that we need to look outside the box, but rather that we need to be willing to peek into differing boxes. 

David Gilbert
EcoSys Holistic Wellness Center
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

January 18, 2012

The old sanatorium approach with lots of sunlight exposure to TB has now been shown to have had a sound biological rationale. Higher levels of vitamin D have been shown to boost the immune system's efficacy in fighting TB (among many other infections). Current research has shown that getting vitamin D levels up to 80-90 ng/ml has often had dramatic positive effects on the human body. However, there is a catch, Vit D2 (prescription vit D) does not stay in the body for long and in at least one study is associated with an increased rate of all cause death. Vit D3 although associated with a reduction in all cause death rates, uses a different metabolic process than Vit D produced by ultraviolet exposure and hence may be less effective than mid day sunlight exposure.

Aside from the fact that you can't make money with vit D therapy, it seems a no brainer to conduct a study checking vit D blood levels of those with TB, then monitor the effects of using a safe UV source such as tanning beds with electronic ballasts (to prevent exposure to intense EMF fields from magnetic ballasts), to bring blood levels up to 90 ng/ml. This is an extremely conservative approach and would be inexpensive.

I know all the money and power is in drugs, but some times you just have to step up and do the right thing. Explore protocols which offer an extraordinarily high safety profile, but still offer a significant possibility of positive outcomes.

Organizations such as EvinceNaturals are already doing some similar work. Providing at no cost,  nutrient/enzyme protocols for open label studies in Asthma, Autism, Endometriosis, Fibromyalgia, Growing Pains, Interstitial Cystitis, Over Active Bladder, Restless Leg Syndrome and PTSD in military personnel or veterans.

Health care costs are beggaring the world, while the burden of disease continues to grow. We need to explore the low hanging inexpensive fruit. It's not so much that we need to look outside the box, but rather that we need to be willing to peek into differing boxes. 

David Gilbert
EcoSys Holistic Wellness Center
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

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