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Double Grants, Double Trouble

Observers see grant application fraud as evidence that tighter controls preventing duplicate funding are necessary.

By | February 8, 2012

image: Double Grants, Double Trouble Wikimedia Commons, National Science Foundation

WIKIMEDIA COMMONS, NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION

Grant fraud charges brought against a researcher at Pennsylvania State University are prompting some observers to call for stricter regulations to prevent investigators from accepting duplicate funding for the same research. In January, electrical engineer Craig Grimes pled guilty to charges that he accepted grants from both the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy for the same study investigating conversion of carbon dioxide into hydrocarbons by solar energy, reports Nature.

Though Grimes had received funding from the NSF in 2009, he also applied for an Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) grant from the DOE, maintaining that he was without other funding sources. Grimes is not the only researcher accused of grant application misconduct. In 2010, electrical engineer Guifang Li of the University of Central Florida in Orlando was barred from applying for NSF funds for two years after the NSF and US Air Force found duplicate text in separate applications he'd submitted to win grants for the same research.

Some US lawmakers see these missteps as evidence that more care needs to be taken to spot plagiarism or duplicate grant applications long before funds are awarded.

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Avatar of: Sledge Hammer

Sledge Hammer

Posts: 3

February 8, 2012

The duplicate funding charge was Count II according to the DOJ memo.  The more damning charge was Count I which states...

 In the application, Grimes specifically represented to NIH that he
would direct approximately $509,274.00 to the Hershey Medical Center to
conduct clinical research on adult and infant subjects. The money was
never paid. Instead, the grant funds were misappropriated, in part, by
Grimes for his own use. The clinical studies/trials were not performed.

He stole the money. This begs the question if he would have been tried just for getting funding for duplicate work.

Avatar of: EllenHunt

EllenHunt

Posts: 74

February 8, 2012

 Ah, I see. I remember scientist years ago who stole a lot of money, around that much, and gave it to a prostitute who was conning him, poor man. My memory is a little fuzzy, but didn't that one also wind up shooting somebody?

I wonder what the whole sordid story is on this guy. Many scientists don't get much human education in growing up you know. It's not part of the program, and we can spend all too much time with our nose to the grindstone, making us excellent pickings for smooth talkers.

Avatar of: EllenHunt

EllenHunt

Posts: 74

February 8, 2012

I am very curious! What on earth were these "clinical studies" for CO2 conversion by solar energy?!  Inquiring minds are verrah, verrah curious. I just can't imagine what that could be!  Was he creating human embryos with chloroplasts to make a new branch of the human species?

I could go for that! I could, I could! My skin would be in such better condition and so nice and green!

But seriously, Mr. Sledge Hammer dear. What on earth was he proposing to do?!

Avatar of: jkhirsh

jkhirsh

Posts: 6

February 8, 2012

In the DOJ Memo it states Count I was related to a separate grant proposal: "Grimes, acting through his solely-owned company, SentechBiomed, State College, PA requested a $1,196,359.00 grant from NIH to perform research related to the measurement of gases in a patient's blood. The measurement of these gases was purported to be relevant to detecting the presence of a disease in infants known as necrotizing enterocolitis. "

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

February 8, 2012

The duplicate funding charge was Count II according to the DOJ memo.  The more damning charge was Count I which states...

 In the application, Grimes specifically represented to NIH that he
would direct approximately $509,274.00 to the Hershey Medical Center to
conduct clinical research on adult and infant subjects. The money was
never paid. Instead, the grant funds were misappropriated, in part, by
Grimes for his own use. The clinical studies/trials were not performed.

He stole the money. This begs the question if he would have been tried just for getting funding for duplicate work.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

February 8, 2012

 Ah, I see. I remember scientist years ago who stole a lot of money, around that much, and gave it to a prostitute who was conning him, poor man. My memory is a little fuzzy, but didn't that one also wind up shooting somebody?

I wonder what the whole sordid story is on this guy. Many scientists don't get much human education in growing up you know. It's not part of the program, and we can spend all too much time with our nose to the grindstone, making us excellent pickings for smooth talkers.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

February 8, 2012

I am very curious! What on earth were these "clinical studies" for CO2 conversion by solar energy?!  Inquiring minds are verrah, verrah curious. I just can't imagine what that could be!  Was he creating human embryos with chloroplasts to make a new branch of the human species?

I could go for that! I could, I could! My skin would be in such better condition and so nice and green!

But seriously, Mr. Sledge Hammer dear. What on earth was he proposing to do?!

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

February 8, 2012

In the DOJ Memo it states Count I was related to a separate grant proposal: "Grimes, acting through his solely-owned company, SentechBiomed, State College, PA requested a $1,196,359.00 grant from NIH to perform research related to the measurement of gases in a patient's blood. The measurement of these gases was purported to be relevant to detecting the presence of a disease in infants known as necrotizing enterocolitis. "

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

February 8, 2012

The duplicate funding charge was Count II according to the DOJ memo.  The more damning charge was Count I which states...

 In the application, Grimes specifically represented to NIH that he
would direct approximately $509,274.00 to the Hershey Medical Center to
conduct clinical research on adult and infant subjects. The money was
never paid. Instead, the grant funds were misappropriated, in part, by
Grimes for his own use. The clinical studies/trials were not performed.

He stole the money. This begs the question if he would have been tried just for getting funding for duplicate work.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

February 8, 2012

 Ah, I see. I remember scientist years ago who stole a lot of money, around that much, and gave it to a prostitute who was conning him, poor man. My memory is a little fuzzy, but didn't that one also wind up shooting somebody?

I wonder what the whole sordid story is on this guy. Many scientists don't get much human education in growing up you know. It's not part of the program, and we can spend all too much time with our nose to the grindstone, making us excellent pickings for smooth talkers.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

February 8, 2012

I am very curious! What on earth were these "clinical studies" for CO2 conversion by solar energy?!  Inquiring minds are verrah, verrah curious. I just can't imagine what that could be!  Was he creating human embryos with chloroplasts to make a new branch of the human species?

I could go for that! I could, I could! My skin would be in such better condition and so nice and green!

But seriously, Mr. Sledge Hammer dear. What on earth was he proposing to do?!

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

February 8, 2012

In the DOJ Memo it states Count I was related to a separate grant proposal: "Grimes, acting through his solely-owned company, SentechBiomed, State College, PA requested a $1,196,359.00 grant from NIH to perform research related to the measurement of gases in a patient's blood. The measurement of these gases was purported to be relevant to detecting the presence of a disease in infants known as necrotizing enterocolitis. "

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