Institute Keeps Chronic Fatigue Grant

The Institute whose now-retracted research linking chronic fatigue syndrome to a viral pathogen will keep its $1.5 million grant.

By | February 9, 2012

University of Nevada, Reno campus where the Whittemore Peterson Institute is locatedFLICKR, JOEMACJR

Chronic fatigue syndrome researcher Judy Mikovits’ former employer, The Whittemore Peterson Institute (WPI) for Neuro-Immune Disease, will get to keep her grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), reported ScienceInsider.  Mikovits was fired from WPI in September, and a few months later her controversial paper linking chronic fatigue syndrome to a viral cause was retracted by Science without complete author approval.

After Mikovits left WPI, the NIAID visited the institute to assess whether her co-author Vincent Lombardi could take over as PI on the grant, and officially approved him on Tuesday (February 7). The 5-year $1.5 million grant will end in August 2014.

It’s a rare bit of good news for WPI, which in addition to being entangled in legal battles with Mikovits over lab documents she allegedly stole, is currently being sued over allegations that the founders of the institute embezzled millions to support a lavish lifestyle from another company they co-own.

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