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Chemo for Stroke?

A chemotherapy medication designed to kill cancer may prevent neuronal death after stroke, according to a study in mice.

By | February 27, 2012

Hospital gownPERFECTO INSECTO

An experimental chemotherapeutic compound called ABT-737 intended to treat various forms of cancer also appears to protect against cell death in mice after stroke, according to Nature Neuroscience.

In cancer cells the drug appears to work by triggering the cell’s apoptosis signaling cascade, mediated by proteins including the anti-apoptosic molecules, Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. ABT-737 inhibits the action of these molecules, driving the cancer cells towards cell-death rather than survival.  In neuronal cells, however, a fragment of the Bcl-xL protein can activate apoptosis, especially after stroke, the researchers found.  When mice were treated with ABT-737 before or after an induced  stroke, the neurons were protected, and did not undergo the delayed death that is usually observed.

Researchers think that this Bcl-xL fragment could be a useful target for developing better drugs for stroke victims.

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Avatar of: mgertner4

mgertner4

Posts: 1

February 27, 2012

This study was carried out in the laboratories of Elizabeth Jonas, Yale University School of Medicine, R. Suzanne Zukin, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and J. Marie Hardwick, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and was published on Feb 26 in the online edition of Nature Neuroscience.

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Posts: 0

February 27, 2012

This study was carried out in the laboratories of Elizabeth Jonas, Yale University School of Medicine, R. Suzanne Zukin, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and J. Marie Hardwick, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and was published on Feb 26 in the online edition of Nature Neuroscience.

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Posts: 0

February 28, 2012

IS it simply another iron chelator?
When one has a stroke , blood spills and the iron in the red blood cells is released and causes destruction.
"The role of iron neurotoxicity in ischemic stroke."
Iron chelators have been tested in stroke.
"Minocycline-Induced Attenuation of Iron Overload and Brain Injury After Experimental Intracerebral Hemorrhage"
"Minocycline chelated iron"
"Its activity exceeded that of deferoxamine"

Iron chelators are used in 'chemo' against cancer.
"The Hydroxypyridinone Iron Chelator CP94 Can Enhance PpIX-induced PDT of Cultured Human Glioma Cells" 
"NOVEL THIOSEMICARBAZONE IRON CHELATORS INDUCE UP-REGULATION ANDPHOSPHORYLATION OF THE METASTASIS SUPPRESSOR, NDRG1: A NEW STRATEGYFOR THE TREATMENT OF PANCREATIC CANCER."
"Doxorubicin (DOX) up-regulated mRNA levels of the iron-regulatedgenes transferrin receptor-1 (TfR1) and N-myc downstream-regulated gene-1 (Ndrg1). This effect was mediated by iron depletion, because it was reversed by adding iron and it was prevented by saturating the anthracycline metal binding site with iron."

Avatar of: Tom Hennessy

Tom Hennessy

Posts: 1457

February 28, 2012

IS it simply another iron chelator?
When one has a stroke , blood spills and the iron in the red blood cells is released and causes destruction.
"The role of iron neurotoxicity in ischemic stroke."
Iron chelators have been tested in stroke.
"Minocycline-Induced Attenuation of Iron Overload and Brain Injury After Experimental Intracerebral Hemorrhage"
"Minocycline chelated iron"
"Its activity exceeded that of deferoxamine"

Iron chelators are used in 'chemo' against cancer.
"The Hydroxypyridinone Iron Chelator CP94 Can Enhance PpIX-induced PDT of Cultured Human Glioma Cells" 
"NOVEL THIOSEMICARBAZONE IRON CHELATORS INDUCE UP-REGULATION ANDPHOSPHORYLATION OF THE METASTASIS SUPPRESSOR, NDRG1: A NEW STRATEGYFOR THE TREATMENT OF PANCREATIC CANCER."
"Doxorubicin (DOX) up-regulated mRNA levels of the iron-regulatedgenes transferrin receptor-1 (TfR1) and N-myc downstream-regulated gene-1 (Ndrg1). This effect was mediated by iron depletion, because it was reversed by adding iron and it was prevented by saturating the anthracycline metal binding site with iron."

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