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Electron Microscopy Through the Ages

Take a tour through the revolutionary menthod's past, present, and future.

By | March 1, 2012

Scanning electron micrograph of an unidentified insect resting on the distal antennal segments of a dead dragonfly.

Scanning electron micrograph of an unidentified insect resting on the distal antennal segments of a dead dragonfly.

CDC

Electron Microscopy Through the Ages Image Gallery

Invented in the early 1930s, electron microscopy revolutionized the fields of materials science and ushered in the new field of cell biology. The magnification power achieved by electron microscopes was unprecedented, and for the first time scientists were able to visualize the subcellular world.

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Avatar of: kenwil

kenwil

Posts: 5

March 5, 2012

Why is it that the magnification is never shown? Also some of these photos are colored - how?

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

March 5, 2012

Why is it that the magnification is never shown? Also some of these photos are colored - how?

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

March 6, 2012

Yeah, I agree with last comment that photos should have more info if possible.
wikipedia photos are more documented for equivalent....see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F...
as an example

Avatar of: Robin H

Robin H

Posts: 4

March 6, 2012

Yeah, I agree with last comment that photos should have more info if possible.
wikipedia photos are more documented for equivalent....see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F...
as an example

March 7, 2012

The first electron microscope to peer at an intact cell was a Siemens UM100  installed in the fall of 1942 at the Physics Laboratories of the Istituto Superiore di Sanità (the Italian National Institute of Health) in Rome.The subject of the first electron micrograph of a biological sample taken on November 27, 1942 was a an intact cell of the bacterium Leptospira acquatilis while electron micrographs of Rickettsia prowazeki were published  on the journal Rendiconti dell'Istituto Superiore di Sanità,6:298-304 (1943). To read more : Gianfranco Donelli, Electron microscopy at Istituto Superiore di Sanità (1942-1992):from Laboratori di Fisica to Laboratorio di Ultrastrutture ,Rome 2008. (For further informations: gianfranco.donelli@gmail.com) 

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

March 7, 2012

The first electron microscope to peer at an intact cell was a Siemens UM100  installed in the fall of 1942 at the Physics Laboratories of the Istituto Superiore di Sanità (the Italian National Institute of Health) in Rome.The subject of the first electron micrograph of a biological sample taken on November 27, 1942 was a an intact cell of the bacterium Leptospira acquatilis while electron micrographs of Rickettsia prowazeki were published  on the journal Rendiconti dell'Istituto Superiore di Sanità,6:298-304 (1943). To read more : Gianfranco Donelli, Electron microscopy at Istituto Superiore di Sanità (1942-1992):from Laboratori di Fisica to Laboratorio di Ultrastrutture ,Rome 2008. (For further informations: gianfranco.donelli@gmail.com) 

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

April 17, 2012

 Magnification should always be indicated numerically or rather by a scale bar. Early microscopes did not print image data in the figure field and separate records were either lost or omitted at some point.
Electron micrographs are always grey-scale black and white images. They are, however, sometimes "pseudo"-colored by adding colors with, for instance, an image processing program afterwards for illustrational purposes.

Avatar of: lajope

lajope

Posts: 1

April 17, 2012

 Magnification should always be indicated numerically or rather by a scale bar. Early microscopes did not print image data in the figure field and separate records were either lost or omitted at some point.
Electron micrographs are always grey-scale black and white images. They are, however, sometimes "pseudo"-colored by adding colors with, for instance, an image processing program afterwards for illustrational purposes.

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