Bioethicist Resigns from CellTex

Bioethicist Glenn McGee, founder of the American Journal of Bioethics, resigned from a controversial stem cell company.

By | March 1, 2012

After vocal opposition to his decision to join much-criticized CellTex Therapeutics, bioethicist Glenn McGee resigned from the stem cell company on February 28, reported Nature.

Three months ago, McGee took the position of president of ethics and strategic initiatives at CellTex. The move incited a backlash within the bioethics community, with critics voicing concerns regarding conflicts of interest stemming from McGee’s continued role as editor at the American Journal of Bioethics. McGee had described his move as an attempt to bring ethical standards to CellTex, which has been criticized for banking patients’ stem cells for unapproved and unproven therapies.

McGee announced his resignation via Twitter yesterday (February 29), saying “I am preparing timely, lengthy, pointed comments on the whole matter.”

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Avatar of: wing_ding

wing_ding

Posts: 4

March 2, 2012

McGee resigns?! Whatever prompted him to join the company with which to begin? My initial reaction is one of the exercise of bad judgement. His comments should prove interesting and in particular how this lack of judgement will affect his standing in the "ethics" community.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

March 2, 2012

McGee resigns?! Whatever prompted him to join the company with which to begin? My initial reaction is one of the exercise of bad judgement. His comments should prove interesting and in particular how this lack of judgement will affect his standing in the "ethics" community.

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