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FDA Approves New Gum Grafts

A new gum graft technique promises to give patients with receding gums a less-painful surgical alternative.

By | March 14, 2012

image: FDA Approves New Gum Grafts Wikimedia Commons, Dozenist

WIKIMEDIA COMMONS, DOZENIST

Surgery for receding gums can be painful, as tissue from the roof of a patient’s mouth is removed and transplanted to the scanty gum area. A new technique, approved last week (March 9) by the US Food and Drug Administration, may alleviate some of this pain, reported The Boston Globe. Tissue regeneration is promoted by the transplantation of human keratinocytes and fibroblasts grown on a bovine collagen scaffold, called Gintuit by its creator, Massachusetts-based biotech Organogenesis Inc.

A clinical trial showed that Gintuit successfully promoted gum regeneration, though not quite as well as the standard method, and was preferred by patients. Organogenesis’s press release also notes that Gintuit-regenerated tissue better matched patients’ own gum tissue than tissue grafted from the roof of the mouth.

“It’s very attractive to patients to not have to cut open the roof of the mouth in procedures,” Geoff MacKay, chief executive of Organogenesis, told The Globe, adding that Gintuit will also help reduce the number of surgeries necessary.

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Comments

Avatar of: Cheryl Soehl

Cheryl Soehl

Posts: 2

March 14, 2012

Why not just give folks a course of dilantin to encourage gum tissue growth?  It's no worse than a lot of other off-label drug uses?

 

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

March 14, 2012

Why not just give folks a course of dilantin to encourage gum tissue growth?  It's no worse than a lot of other off-label drug uses?

 

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

March 15, 2012

I'd check phenytoin on Wikipedia before trying it. The article and then searching Google and reading a few items was enough to give me pause. But I like your idea. We need a drug to encourage better gum health, because most people experience recession of the gums with age. 

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

March 15, 2012

Cheryl this was meant as humour, right? If so, good one.

This latest advance seems very exciting. In addition to the clinicals which are provided, it would be interesting to get some more insight relating to patient feedback, and also to actually view some cases.

Avatar of: SynicInSF

SynicInSF

Posts: 2

March 15, 2012

I'd check phenytoin on Wikipedia before trying it. The article and then searching Google and reading a few items was enough to give me pause. But I like your idea. We need a drug to encourage better gum health, because most people experience recession of the gums with age. 

Avatar of: Christine Sutherland

Christine Sutherland

Posts: 1457

March 15, 2012

Cheryl this was meant as humour, right? If so, good one.

This latest advance seems very exciting. In addition to the clinicals which are provided, it would be interesting to get some more insight relating to patient feedback, and also to actually view some cases.

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