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Telltale Tortoises

Researchers are permanently marking endangered reptiles in Madagascar to keep the animals from entering the illegal wildlife trade. Read the full story. [gallery]

By | April 1, 2012

A tattoed Plougshare tortoise released into the Madagascar wildernessDurrell Wildlife Conservation Trust

A tattoed Plougshare tortoise released into the Madagascar wildernessDurrell Wildlife Conservation Trust

Telltale Tortoises Image Gallery

Researchers are permanently marking endangered reptiles in Madagascar to keep the animals from entering the illegal wildlife trade.

Read the full story.[gallery]

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Comments

Avatar of: emmaconner

emmaconner

Posts: 1

April 3, 2012

hey jef akst,Genius work.very beautiful animals and impressive research.I appreciate your work its really cool.
Raynes Park Removals

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Posts: 0

April 3, 2012

hey jef akst,Genius work.very beautiful animals and impressive research.I appreciate your work its really cool.
Raynes Park Removals

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

April 10, 2012

 

An essential part of why I think the Durrell Wildlife
Conservation Trust’s approach with this project makes complete sense is that
they are working directly with and in support of local people. Marking the
tortoises’ shells as they’re doing will hopefully be as effective a protection
as cutting off rhinoceros horns can work to save rhinos’ lives from poachers.
Either way there’s no long-term conservation without local development. As
anywhere, physical conservation and related development work will not effectively
take root without duly tapping into local peoples’ deeper energies and gaining
‘competitive advantage’ among their culture’s evolving ideas. The fate of these
tortoises (whether seen in terms of ‘Darwinian evolution’ or ‘Deep ecology’)
does appear to hinge just now on competing energies and ideas of humans.

Avatar of: malmitchell

malmitchell

Posts: 1

April 10, 2012

 

An essential part of why I think the Durrell Wildlife
Conservation Trust’s approach with this project makes complete sense is that
they are working directly with and in support of local people. Marking the
tortoises’ shells as they’re doing will hopefully be as effective a protection
as cutting off rhinoceros horns can work to save rhinos’ lives from poachers.
Either way there’s no long-term conservation without local development. As
anywhere, physical conservation and related development work will not effectively
take root without duly tapping into local peoples’ deeper energies and gaining
‘competitive advantage’ among their culture’s evolving ideas. The fate of these
tortoises (whether seen in terms of ‘Darwinian evolution’ or ‘Deep ecology’)
does appear to hinge just now on competing energies and ideas of humans.

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