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UNC Debates Open Access

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is considering a policy of open-access-only publishing for its faculty.

By | March 22, 2012

image: UNC Debates Open Access Flickr, dullhunk

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The committee on copyright at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is debating whether to require faculty members to publish in open-access journals, reported The Daily Tar Heel. Funds already exist through UNC’s Health Sciences Library to help faculty members who want to publish in free journals, but it is not yet a university-wide policy to require professors to do so.

“If you aspire to do what the University mission says and spread a wealth of knowledge to the citizens of North Carolina and, as much as possible, the world, then you should consider open access and make it a top priority,” committee member Paul Jones told The Daily Tar Heel, although he acknowledged certain disadvantages to the open-access model, like a more limited selection of journals.

Though a variety of institutions, including Harvard University, the University of California at Berkeley, Dartmouth College, and Columbia University, have signed the Compact for Open-Access Publishing Equity (COPE), thus promising to establish long-term funding strategies to underwrite publication fees necessary to support open-access journals, UNC appears to be one of the first universities to consider requiring faculty to publish in these journals.

In another model, Princeton University authorizes faculty members to post papers in open-access repositories, and push back against publishers who ask faculty to sign exclusive copyright contracts.

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Comments

Avatar of: Peter Suber

Peter Suber

Posts: 1

March 23, 2012

UNC is *not* considering a policy to require faculty to publish in OA journals. That was an error by the author of the article in the student paper. I suggested this possibility in a comment on the article, and my suspicion was confirmed by Paul lJones, a professor at UNC. 

Please see the comment section on the original article:
http://www.dailytarheel.com/in... 

Also see my short blog post on why this matters:
https://plus.google.com/109377... 

Avatar of: TheSciAdmin

TheSciAdmin

Posts: 56

March 23, 2012

Thanks for pointing out the mistake. We've adjusted our story and posted a correction.

Thanks for reading!
~Jef Akst, editor, The Scientist

Avatar of: Paul Jones

Paul Jones

Posts: 1457

March 23, 2012

Supporting @google-4b1ce0d79f2f8226bfcb886d93f61764:disqus 's comment and adding a bit. My own ideal requirement would be more Princeton like that is to require Open Access to material regardless of the journal in which the papers are published. NIH and other institutions already have the same requirements for projects receiving their funding.

UNC already has an Open Access policy (since 2005). The discussion was about reviving interest in that policy.Kate McGraw reminded us of the history:

UNC-CH Faculty Council passed two resolutions in March of 2005 that should be revisited in the current conversation about faculty publishing and open access. Resolution 2005-7 states “Be it resolved that UNC-CH faculty are the owners of their research and should retain ownership and use open access publication venues whenever possible.â€쳌 
http://www.unc.edu/faculty/fac...
Resolution 2005-8 established a task force to determine the feasibility of establishing an institutional repository. The Carolina Digital Repository grew out of that exploration. http://www.unc.edu/faculty/fac...
Additionally, The Office of the Provost has and continues to funds to support Open Access publishing by UNC scholars  http://guides.lib.unc.edu/open... for more (as noted in the article above)

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

March 23, 2012

UNC is *not* considering a policy to require faculty to publish in OA journals. That was an error by the author of the article in the student paper. I suggested this possibility in a comment on the article, and my suspicion was confirmed by Paul lJones, a professor at UNC. 

Please see the comment section on the original article:
http://www.dailytarheel.com/in... 

Also see my short blog post on why this matters:
https://plus.google.com/109377... 

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

March 23, 2012

Thanks for pointing out the mistake. We've adjusted our story and posted a correction.

Thanks for reading!
~Jef Akst, editor, The Scientist

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

March 23, 2012

Supporting @google-4b1ce0d79f2f8226bfcb886d93f61764:disqus 's comment and adding a bit. My own ideal requirement would be more Princeton like that is to require Open Access to material regardless of the journal in which the papers are published. NIH and other institutions already have the same requirements for projects receiving their funding.

UNC already has an Open Access policy (since 2005). The discussion was about reviving interest in that policy.Kate McGraw reminded us of the history:

UNC-CH Faculty Council passed two resolutions in March of 2005 that should be revisited in the current conversation about faculty publishing and open access. Resolution 2005-7 states “Be it resolved that UNC-CH faculty are the owners of their research and should retain ownership and use open access publication venues whenever possible.â€쳌 
http://www.unc.edu/faculty/fac...
Resolution 2005-8 established a task force to determine the feasibility of establishing an institutional repository. The Carolina Digital Repository grew out of that exploration. http://www.unc.edu/faculty/fac...
Additionally, The Office of the Provost has and continues to funds to support Open Access publishing by UNC scholars  http://guides.lib.unc.edu/open... for more (as noted in the article above)

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