Stem Cell Researcher Fabricates Data

A scientist who claimed to have injected monkey embryonic stem cells into the eyes of rats to improve their vision accepts the penalty for research misconduct.

By | April 16, 2012

FLICKR, ASPLOSH

The Office of Research Integrity has found that Peter J. Francis, an associate professor at the Casey Eye Institute of Oregon Health & Science University, fabricated data on two grant applications that he submitted to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Eye Institute (NEI). In those reports, he discussed pilot experiments in which he injected retinal pigment cells derived from Rhesus monkey embryonic stem cells (ECS) into rats with retinal degeneration to improve their vision. He claimed that the rats then grew new retinal cells with no noticeable side effects.

Upon investigation by the ORI, Francis admitted that the experiments had never actually been done and agreed to have his research supervised for 2 years, in addition to other restrictions.

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Comments

Avatar of: MAGS01

MAGS01

Posts: 25

April 16, 2012

Isn't this fraud?

Avatar of: Shi V. Liu

Shi V. Liu

Posts: 1457

April 16, 2012

This is a crime!

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

April 16, 2012

This is a crime!

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

April 16, 2012

Isn't this fraud?

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

April 19, 2012

This is outrageous. This was not some postdoc from a foreign country who could plead ignorance of our laws and customs, nor even a junior investigator who felt desperate and pressured. This guy should be drummed out of the profession, fired from his position for cause and barred from receiving any Federal funding. This kind of slap on the wrist merely encourages others to obtain funding by unethical means. It's not as if there is any shortage of scientists. There is no reason to tolerate liars and cheats in our profession.

Avatar of: BobHurst

BobHurst

Posts: 31

April 19, 2012

This is outrageous. This was not some postdoc from a foreign country who could plead ignorance of our laws and customs, nor even a junior investigator who felt desperate and pressured. This guy should be drummed out of the profession, fired from his position for cause and barred from receiving any Federal funding. This kind of slap on the wrist merely encourages others to obtain funding by unethical means. It's not as if there is any shortage of scientists. There is no reason to tolerate liars and cheats in our profession.

Avatar of: Albert

Albert

Posts: 1457

April 20, 2012

Just wondering if there really aren't enough honest scientists to do real science. Why slap liars and cheats with a feather on the wrist and contribute to corruption of systems to the detriment of science and honest scientists?

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

April 20, 2012

Just wondering if there really aren't enough honest scientists to do real science. Why slap liars and cheats with a feather on the wrist and contribute to corruption of systems to the detriment of science and honest scientists?

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