New Brain Stem Cell

Progenitor cells discovered in the brain’s small blood vessels have the capacity to differentiate into neurons and other tissue types.

By | April 23, 2012

Wellcome Images, Mark Lythgoe & Chloe Hutton

WELLCOME IMAGES, MARK LYTHGOE & CHLOE HUTTON

Researchers have isolated a previously uncharacterized progenitor cell population from two regions of the adult human brain, the ventricular zone wall and the neocortex, a new PLoS ONE study reported.Although their function remains to be determined, the new cells resemble mesenchymal stem cells and have the capacity to differentiate into adipocytes, chondroblasts, osteoblasts, glial cells, and immature neurons in vitro.

“Most interesting is their ability to form neuronal cells,” lead author Gesine Paul-Visse, neuroscientist at Lund University said in a press release. “The results contribute to a better understanding of how brain cell plasticity works and opens up new opportunities to exploit these very features.”

Among the possibilities for these new cells, the researchers hope they can be used for healing and repairing brain tissue.

Add a Comment

Avatar of: You

You

Processing...
Processing...

Sign In with your LabX Media Group Passport to leave a comment

Not a member? Register Now!

LabX Media Group Passport Logo

Popular Now

  1. Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal
    News & Opinion Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal

    My “colleagues” and I at the fictitious Arthur Vandelay Urological Research Institute were surprised to find our bogus “uromycitisis” case report swiftly accepted, with only minor revisions requested.

  2. Consilience, Episode 3: Cancer, Obscured
  3. A History of Screening for Natural Products to Fight Cancer
  4. March for Science: Dispatches from Washington, DC
AAAS