Telomere Basics

Telomeres are repetitive, noncoding sequences that cap the ends of linear chromosomes. They consist of hexameric nucleotide sequences (TTAGGG in humans) repeated hundreds to thousands of times. 

By | May 1, 2012

Infographic: Telomere Basics
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SCOTT LEIGHTON, CMI

Telomeres are repetitive, noncoding sequences that cap the ends of linear chromosomes. They consist of hexameric nucleotide sequences (TTAGGG in humans) repeated hundreds to thousands of times. Telomeres protect the protein-coding sequences of DNA on the chromosome, and telomeric shortening during sequential cell divisions is believed to dictate a cell’s life span.

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Comments

Avatar of: Katherine

Katherine

Posts: 1457

May 22, 2012

Wonderful graphic and a nice, clear, concise explanation. Thank you!

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

May 22, 2012

Wonderful graphic and a nice, clear, concise explanation. Thank you!

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Posts: 0

May 29, 2012

 I first heard about telomeres about a year ago.  I was introduced to a company that was working on a Telomere Support Supplement.  It became available in August 2011.  I have been taking it since then, and I am seeing real results.  There is a website that you can check out, it has a lot of information about telomeres (www.wellnesscentertn.com)

Avatar of: Regina Collins

Regina Collins

Posts: 1457

May 29, 2012

 I first heard about telomeres about a year ago.  I was introduced to a company that was working on a Telomere Support Supplement.  It became available in August 2011.  I have been taking it since then, and I am seeing real results.  There is a website that you can check out, it has a lot of information about telomeres (www.wellnesscentertn.com)

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