More Research Money for MDs

Principal investigators with medical training have a slightly higher NIH funding rate than those with just a PhD.

By | May 1, 2012

Flickr, 401K

FLICKR, 401K

Researchers with medical degrees find it slightly easier to obtain government funding than traditional PhD investigators, according to a blog post written by the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) deputy director for extramural research, Sally Rockey. After going over 13 years’ worth of NIH funding data (from 1998 to 2011), Rockey found that funding rates of principal investigators (PIs) holding MD or MD/PhDs, who represent around 30 percent of all NIH-funded PIs, are slightly higher than funding rates of PIs without medical training.

“There is a difference, but it is modest,” Rockey wrote in her blog Rock Talk, adding that she plans to look at how these funding rates vary by institution type.

Add a Comment

Avatar of: You

You

Processing...
Processing...

Sign In with your LabX Media Group Passport to leave a comment

Not a member? Register Now!

LabX Media Group Passport Logo

Comments

Avatar of: Trinidad1

Trinidad1

Posts: 1

May 1, 2012

Excuse me "just a PhD"?

A PhD is the highest degree offered.

Avatar of: greyhairbloke

greyhairbloke

Posts: 1

May 1, 2012

Who would have thought all those years ago that I could've done an MD degree and not bothered with formal science research training (or an MD with a shortened PhD duration) and still had the same research career - just with more funding options, dollar amounts, and job security! 
I wonder if I can start seeing patients since I use human datasets in my research? I do have a (lowly) PhD.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

May 1, 2012

Excuse me "just a PhD"?

A PhD is the highest degree offered.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

May 1, 2012

Who would have thought all those years ago that I could've done an MD degree and not bothered with formal science research training (or an MD with a shortened PhD duration) and still had the same research career - just with more funding options, dollar amounts, and job security! 
I wonder if I can start seeing patients since I use human datasets in my research? I do have a (lowly) PhD.

Avatar of:

Posts: 0

May 2, 2012

Remember these articles are written by Freelance authors/editors who likely do not hold a PhD (the real Doctorate !!) and who do not have their written words peer-reviewed, no matter how insulting the reference to "just a PhD" may appear.

Avatar of: Marc Williams

Marc Williams

Posts: 1457

May 2, 2012

Remember these articles are written by Freelance authors/editors who likely do not hold a PhD (the real Doctorate !!) and who do not have their written words peer-reviewed, no matter how insulting the reference to "just a PhD" may appear.

Popular Now

  1. How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine
  2. Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists
    The Nutshell Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

    According to citation statistics, researchers behind programmed cell death pathways and CRISPR/Cas9 are among those in line for Nobel Prizes this year.

  3. Sequencing Reveals Genomic Diversity of the Human Brain
  4. Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts
    The Nutshell Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts

    An open-access journal is trialing a peer-review process in which reviewers do not have access to the results or discussion sections of submitted papers.

RayBiotech