Arctic Ice Melting Fast

The sea ice in the Arctic is expected to hit a record low by the end of the month.

By | August 21, 2012

U.S. Coast Guard Patrick Kelley " > Arctic IceFlickr Creative Commons, U.S. Coast Guard Patrick Kelley

The ebb of Arctic ice during the warm months of the year is expected to reach an all time low by the end of the summer. There will be 186,000 fewer square miles of ice than the previous lowest record, which was in 2007, according to BBC News, and the ice is expected to continue melting into mid- to late-September.

"We got very close to a record minimum last year," Seymour Laxon, professor of climate physics at University College London, told the BBC.  The trend may force scientists to reconsider their predicted date for when the Arctic will be completely melted. In 2007, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reported that as a result of the melting trends, they expected that the Arctic would be ice-free by the year 2100.

"When we had the 2007 minimum, that date was brought forward to 2030-2040,” said Laxon.  "The fact that we look set to get another record ice minimum in such a short space of time means that the modelers may once again need to go and look at what their projections are telling them,"

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