Advertisement
Panasonic
Panasonic

Stem Cell Research Funding Upheld

A US Appeal court rules that the National Institutes of Health is legally allowed to fund human embryonic stem cell research.

By | August 27, 2012

image: Stem Cell Research Funding Upheld Human embryonic stem cells.WIKIMEDIA COMMONS, NISSIM BENVENISTY

The decision by the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit confirms a previous ruling by a lower court, which threw out a lawsuit accusing the National Institutes of Health (NIH) of violating a 1996 law prohibiting taxpayer funding of research that destroys human embryos.

NIH funding of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research hinges on ambiguity in the 1996 Dickey-Wicker law, which "permits federal funding of research projects that utilize already-derived ESCs—which are not themselves embryos—because no ‘human embryo or embryos are destroyed’ in such projects,” Chief Judge David B. Sentelle said in today's ruling.

The lawsuit was brought by two adult stem cell researchers, whose lawyers said today that their clients are considering taking the issue to the US Supreme Court. Although the Supreme Court accepts only about 1 percent of cases, experts say the fact that the three judges involved in this decision ruled in favor of the NIH for different reasons means the legal wrangling might not be over yet.

“NIH will continue to move forward, conducting and funding research in this very promising area of science," NIH Director Francis Collins said in a statement after the decision. "The ruling affirms our commitment to the patients afflicted by diseases that may one day be treatable using the results of this research.”

Add a Comment

Avatar of: You

You

Processing...
Processing...

Sign In with your LabX Media Group Passport to leave a comment

Not a member? Register Now!

LabX Media Group Passport Logo

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube
Advertisement

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Culture Techniques
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science
Advertisement
Mirus
Mirus
Advertisement
NeuroScientistNews
NeuroScientistNews