Online Career Planning

One of the largest biological professional societies has developed an online tool to help early stage scientists plan successful careers.

By | September 7, 2012

Plutor" > Flickr, Plutor

Young researchers will be able to plan their short and long term goals, whether they choose industry, academia, or alternative careers in science, with the help of new online software created by The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB), together with the Medical College of Wisconsin and the University of California, San Francisco.

“As a community, we must do more to help our trainees prepare for a broader range of scientific careers,” FASEB president Judith Bond said in a press release. “Finishing a Ph.D. or postdoc and automatically moving on to a research-faculty position is no longer the norm,” wrote the authors of one of a series of articles aimed at guiding postdocs into using the program.

Called myIDP, for my Individual Development Plan, the service offers users 20 career paths to choose from and helps assess the option that best fits their experience and preferences. It also helps researchers set goals, creates automated reminders to help meet goal deadlines, and provides a catalog of books and articles to inform readers about paths unfamiliar to them.

 

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