Advertisement
Gene Tools
Gene Tools

PUFAs At Work

Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), function in both enzymatic and nonenzymatic pathways to regulate gene expression.

By | November 1, 2012

Advertisement

Add a Comment

Avatar of: You

You

Processing...
Processing...

Sign In with your LabX Media Group Passport to leave a comment

Not a member? Register Now!

LabX Media Group Passport Logo

Comments

Avatar of: James V. Kohl

James V. Kohl

Posts: 110

November 20, 2012

Is nutrient chemical uptake, as occurs with the ingestion of these fatty acids, responsible for de novo gene expression in the non-human primate to human brain that is controlled by nutrient chemical metabolism to pheromones?  If so, adaptive evolution of our brain and behavior appears to be nutrient chemical-dependent and pheromone-controlled as is behavior in species from microbes to man via ecological, social, neurogenic, and socio-cognitive niche construction.

Kohl, J.V. (2012) Human pheromones and food odors: epigenetic influences on the socioaffective nature of evolved behaviors. Socioaffective Neuroscience & Psychology, 2: 17338.

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube
Advertisement

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Culture Techniques
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science
Advertisement
The Scientist
The Scientist
Illumina
Illumina