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NASA Scientists Keep Curiosity Finding Secret

The Mars rover has reportedly made a major discovery, but the world won’t know what it is until next week at the earliest.

By | November 27, 2012

Two of Curiosity's camerasWIKIMEDIA, NASAAs NASA scientists deal with a major Martian dust storm that threatens to interfere with the rover missions exploring the planet, one of the robots, Curiosity, has collected important data concerning the Earth’s planetary neighbor. According to John Grotzinger, chief scientist on the Curiosity team, the rover’s Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument has made important discoveries in the Rocknest area of the Gale Crate, near the spot where Curiosity landed earlier this year. “This data is gonna be one for the history books,” Grotzinger told NPR last week. “It’s looking really good.”

Though Grotzinger and his team will not divulge the nature of the discovery for another few weeks, the SAM instrument is capable of detecting organic compounds using a scaled-down mass spectrometer and gas chromatograph, so finding molecular traces of life is a possibility.

According to SPACE.com, the Curiosity team will report the findings at the fall meeting of the American Geophysical Union, which takes place December 3-7 in San Francisco.

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Avatar of: rosinbio

rosinbio

Posts: 13

November 27, 2012

If the Curiosity team sees fit to postpone divulging their findings, they may very well have a good reason for that.

Attempting to second guess what they might have found is pretty silly. We'll all just have to patiently wait until the team is good and ready to speak!  

Avatar of: kitapbigi

kitapbigi

Posts: 20

February 11, 2013

 

To Dave20640, 65% is the proportion of the 2,000 retracted articles, not of all articles published. If 200,000 articles were published, that would be only 2/3 of one percent of all articles published; not a stunning number. I didn't see anything in the article (or the linked material) that indicated whether 2,000 was large or not, by comparison. What perplexes me is that these people think they are not going to get caught. That makes me wonder if there's a lot more going on than we know about, that they do know about. I then wonder why we don't see, in these reports, information that they were asked if, in their experience, this kind of behavior is widespread. Not that we would necessarily be confident about the veracity of their observations. kredi hesaplama-evim şahane - fragman izle - mobilya modelleri

 

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