Teasing Out New Teeth

Researchers mix cells from human adult gum tissue with tooth-inducing cells from mouse embryos to grow new hybrid teeth complete with roots.

By | March 12, 2013

WIKIMEDIA, DOZENISTCells taken from adult human gums can be combined with cells from the molars of fetal mice to form teeth with viable roots, according to research published this week in the Journal of Dental Research. The method remains a long way from clinical use, but the findings represent a step toward the goal of growing bioengineered replacements for lost teeth.

Teeth develop when embryonic epithelial cells in the mouth combine with mesenchymal cells derived from the neural crest. Previous studies have shown that these cells can be combined in the lab to formal normal teeth, but the challenge was to find non-embryonic source of the cells that could be used in the clinic.

To test one such source, a team lead by King’s College London stem cell biologist Paul Sharpe extracted epithelial cells from the gums of adult humans, cultured them in the lab, and mixed them with mesenchymal tooth cells derived from embryonic mice. After a week, the researchers transplanted this mixture into the protective tissue around the kidneys of living mice, where some of the cells developed into hybrid human/mouse teeth containing dentine and enamel, and with growing roots.

The research showed that the epithelial cells from adult human gum tissue responded to tooth-inducing signals from the embryonic mouse tooth mesenchyme, making the gum cells a realistic source for clinical use, said Sharpe in a press release. He added that “the next major challenge is to identify a way to culture adult human mesenchymal cells to be tooth-inducing, as at the moment we can only make embryonic mesenchymal cells do this.”

(Hat tip to BBC News)

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Comments

Avatar of: junito

junito

Posts: 1

March 14, 2013

Hello i was reading ure add about the teeth and was wondering if you need any valentears for ure experemt my name is luis and ive lost a lot of teeth and my reamaning teeth are ugly do to long time smoking sow if u need a valantear let me know pleas
Avatar of: Benito

Benito

Posts: 1

March 14, 2013

Wow! I woud do anything for a brand new set of teeth. I can't wait till one day they will be offering this in dentistries.

Avatar of: sodoff

sodoff

Posts: 1

March 15, 2013

omg , your coment is so funny xxif they need a valentear ,,lol, am sure they will let you know,,

Avatar of: corleone

corleone

Posts: 1

March 18, 2013

To sodoff. What's even more funny is you understood his message second I assume you must have had some teeth knocked out.  and third look up brain injuries. Amazing. 

 

Avatar of: Brent C

Brent C

Posts: 1

March 18, 2013

I love that there is still hope for those who have outlasted their second set of teeth!!

 The only down side is you develop an overwhelming desire for CHEESE!!

Avatar of: Joe 74656

Joe 74656

Posts: 1

March 21, 2013

Hello , I am amazed and astounded that you have been able to grow a tooth from gum tissue of the patient. My dentist said it would not happen in my life time and that was only 5 years ago. It is at this time that heavy identity took out the wrong tooth during the procedure I was compensated but still dont have a tooth. I am interested in being a test subject. I am a healthy 23 year old who does not smoke at all and drinks moderately. Please email me if this is agreeable at joeannandale@yahoo.co.uk

Avatar of: Debbie_dear

Debbie_dear

Posts: 1

March 24, 2013

This is truely amazing. I used to work in the dental field. It will be almost 10 years now. When i worked in the field change was stagnat. In the 11years I worked in the field there was little change. Nothing of this measure.

Deb.

 

P.S.  correct spelling... "volunteer" If you are ever unsure google it. Google never disappoints

Avatar of: trujar

trujar

Posts: 1

November 2, 2013

I also would be interested in being a "volunteer".  I am 67 years of age, female and in good health except for a little arthritis and bad teeth.  So if the reasearch comes to the US, especially Texas, let me know.

Thanks,  trujar1216@yahoo.com

P. S. One shouldn't make fun of someone who has less education than them. Some people do not have the opportunities, such as in getting proper dental care. At least this person has read the article and taken the time to respond. Without like willing subjects you wouldn't have some of the medical procedures that are available to you now. Hope all is spelled correctly...did google a couple words :-)

Avatar of: rebel

rebel

Posts: 1

July 23, 2014

Yes, Yes, Please I'd like to Volenteer!!!! use me and don't abuse me but please I want teeth!! :)  

 

Seriously, I'd be a good canditate or I'd mke myself one, what do you need?

Avatar of: CSerrano

CSerrano

Posts: 1

November 19, 2014

O have three titanium implants that I want to remove and volunteer for bioteeth restoration please contact me my mouth is suffering from all the metal and my lips won't stop peeling 646 633- 9645

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