March Methods Madness

Thomson Reuters launches Metrics Mania, which will pit universities against each other, not on the basketball court, but in the scientific literature.

By | March 20, 2013

Penn State vs. Colgate, circa 2007WIKIMEDIA, BEN STANFIELDAs the hoops action heats up in the world of college basketball, information company Thomson Reuters is rolling out its citation-based answer to March Madness. “Metrics Mania” will compare the institutional research productivity between the 64 colleges and universities from across the country that will square off starting tomorrow (March 21) in NCAA men’s basketball. Champions of both the basketball tournament and the research contest will be crowned on April 8. Using citation data derived from their Web of Knowledge, Thomson Reuters will provide regular updates concerning head-to-head matchups of the schools competing against each other on the court.

“We are very excited to host the first-ever Metrics Mania,” said Gordon Macomber, managing director of Scientific and Scholarly Research at Thomson Reuters, in a statement. “Not only will this be a fun program for the scholarly research community, but it will also give Thomson Reuters an opportunity to highlight the great research programs within the schools competing in our brackets.”

Bracket heads can follow along with the action at the Metrics Mania website, as well as on Twitter and Facebook.

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